Field Crop News http://fieldcropnews.com/?p=13778 http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/new-food-safety-and-traceability-online-courses/ Uncategorized food safety supply chain management traceability New Food Safety and Traceability Online Courses! Give your company a competitive edge – take free eLearning courses to learn more about industry best practices and to be more competitive in the marketplace! Access the new Food Safety and Traceability eLearning courses online on the Agriculture and Food Education in Ontario online learning system through the University of Guelph, Ridgetown Campus. The new Traceability eLearning courses show... Wed, 24 May 2017 20:07:11 Z http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/new-food-safety-and-traceability-online-courses/#respond OMAFRA Field Crop Team <div class="pf-content"><p>Give your company a competitive edge – take free eLearning courses to learn more about industry best practices and to be more competitive in the marketplace!</p> <p>Access the new Food Safety and Traceability eLearning courses online on the <a href="http://agandfoodeducation.ca/">Agriculture and Food Education in Ontario</a> online learning system through the University of Guelph, Ridgetown Campus.<span id="more-13778"></span></p> <p>The new Traceability eLearning courses show how good practices can:</p> <ul> <li>maximize productivity, improve business efficiency, reduce costs and improve business processes</li> <li>be used to increase competitive advantage by accessing new markets</li> <li>improve supply chain management</li> </ul> <p>The new Food Safety eLearning courses will help you to:</p> <ul> <li>identify food safety hazards that can occur in your operation</li> <li>understand best practices and develop programs to control these hazards</li> <li>decrease the likelihood of food safety hazards that can lead to a foodborne illness outbreak or product recall</li> </ul> <p>Visit the <a href="http://bdc.ridgetownc.com/takecourse/agriculture-and-food/agriculture-and-food-education-courses/">University of Guelph</a> website to register for a FREE account. Then simply log in and begin learning – wherever and whenever is convenient for you! Accessible versions of the courses are available. For more information, contact the University of Guelph, Ridgetown Campus at <a href="mailto:rcagfood@uoguelph.ca">rcagfood@uoguelph.ca</a><strong> or</strong> 519-674-1500 ext. 63295.</p> <p>Do you prefer classroom-based learning? <a href="http://www.ontariosoilcrop.org/oscia-programs/workshops-webinars/">Food Safety and Traceability</a> courses and workshops are still offered by the Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association (OSCIA). Visit their website for the dates and locations of upcoming in-person opportunities.</p> <p>Online course development was funded through <em>Growing Forward 2</em>, a federal-provincial-territorial initiative that encourages innovation, competitiveness and market development in Canada’s agri-food and agri-products sector.</p> </div> http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/new-food-safety-and-traceability-online-courses/feed/ 0 2017-05-24 20:07 +00:00 2017-05-24 16:07 -04:00 http://fieldcropnews.com/?p=13773 http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/new-free-soil-health-publications-available-to-order/ Soil Health croplland retirement erosion organic amendments soil health windbreaks New, free soil health publications available to order! The Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs is rolling out a total of 21 new soil health publications. These publications provide best management practices to help you preserve and conserve soil while improving soil health and crop production. Check out these five new titles on our Soil Health in Ontario web page: Adding Organic Amendments Erosion Control Structures Cropland... Wed, 24 May 2017 20:02:23 Z http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/new-free-soil-health-publications-available-to-order/#respond OMAFRA Field Crop Team <div class="pf-content"><p>The Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs is rolling out a total of 21 new soil health publications. These publications provide best management practices to help you preserve and conserve soil while improving soil health and crop production. Check out these five new titles on our <a href="http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/environment/bmp/soil-health.htm">Soil Health in Ontario</a> web page:<span id="more-13773"></span></p> <p><img class="alignnone size-large wp-image-13774" src="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/line-of-covers-2-1024x269.jpg" alt="line of covers 2" width="1024" height="269" srcset="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/line-of-covers-2-1024x269.jpg 1024w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/line-of-covers-2-300x79.jpg 300w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/line-of-covers-2-768x202.jpg 768w" sizes="(max-width: 1024px) 100vw, 1024px" /></p> <ul> <li>Adding Organic Amendments</li> <li>Erosion Control Structures</li> <li>Cropland Retirement</li> <li>Soil Health in Ontario</li> <li>Field Windbreaks</li> </ul> <p>You know that high quality, healthy, productive soil is the foundation of a strong, sustainable agri-food system. These publications, part of our Best Management Practices series, can help you plan and implement practices to improve soil health and increase yields. Unfortunately, the health of Ontario’s soils is on the decline. While many farmers practice good land management practices, there is much more that can be done to improve soil health and protect soil for long-term productivity.</p> <p>The five titles above are just the beginning. Check our <a href="http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/environment/bmp/soil-health.htm">web page</a> regularly for future publications, which will include:</p> <ul> <li>Cover Crops and Manure</li> <li>No-Till for Soil Health</li> <li>Perennial Systems</li> <li>Subsurface Drainage</li> <li>Soil Erosion by Water</li> <li>Plus many more!</li> </ul> <p>Our soil health publications were developed to support the upcoming <a href="http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/landuse/soilhealth.htm">Agricultural Soil Health and Conservation Strategy</a>. We’re working in partnership with stakeholders and experts to develop the Strategy with the goal to sustain Ontario’s strong agricultural production while protecting the environment and adapting to a changing climate.</p> <p>All of the titles can be ordered through <a href="https://www.publications.serviceontario.ca/pubont/servlet/ecom/">ServiceOntario</a> once published. You can find the ordering information on the <a href="http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/environment/bmp/soil-health.htm">Soil Health in Ontario</a> web page.</p> <p>Do you have soil health questions? Contact our Agricultural Information Contact Centre at 1-877-424-1300 or <a href="mailto:ag.info.omafra@ontario.ca">ag.info.omafra@ontario.ca</a>.</p> <p><a href="http://ontario.ca/c6lr"><strong>ontario.ca/c6lr</strong></a></p> </div> http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/new-free-soil-health-publications-available-to-order/feed/ 0 2017-05-24 20:02 +00:00 2017-05-24 16:02 -04:00 http://fieldcropnews.com/?p=13770 http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/exeter-agribusiness-minutes-may-23-2017/ Ag Business Minutes Exeter Agribusiness Minutes – May 23, 2017 Thanks to Steve Johns, for chairing the meeting and to Jamie O’Shea (Pioneer) for sponsoring breakfast. The next meeting will be Tuesday, June 6th starting at 7:00am for breakfast and 7:30 for the meeting. Robert Maloney will be the chair. Synopsis: There was widespread rainfall over the Victoria Day long weekend with most areas receiving 1-1.5”. With the dry weather... Wed, 24 May 2017 15:59:45 Z http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/exeter-agribusiness-minutes-may-23-2017/#respond OMAFRA Field Crop Team <div class="pf-content"><p>Thanks to Steve Johns, for chairing the meeting and to Jamie O’Shea (Pioneer) for sponsoring breakfast.</p> <p>The next meeting will be <strong>Tuesday, June 6th</strong> starting at 7:00am for breakfast and 7:30 for the meeting. Robert Maloney will be the chair.</p> <p><strong>Synopsis: </strong>There was widespread rainfall over the Victoria Day long weekend with most areas receiving 1-1.5”. With the dry weather at the end of last week corn and soybean planting was in full swing with most of the corn in the area now planted. Soybean planting is progressing with some fields beginning to emerge. Estimates ranged from 30 – 60% seeded depending on the area. Relatively few soybeans have been seeded in Lambton and Niagara. Cover crop management continues to be an issue for those corn growers that did not spray off the crop. Disease continues to remain at low levels in the winter wheat crop. The risk for Fusarium is high this year. Winter wheat will begin heading out in the area in the next few days for early planted wheat. Fields will need to be scouted and the weather monitored for proper timing of FHB fungicide applications. Essentially no edible beans have been planted and growers are encouraged to wait to plant until after the rain events later this week.</p> <p><strong>Corn: </strong>With conditions drying up last week growers were able to get into the fields and corn planting is now 90% complete in the area. Most of the corn planted last week and into the weekend was planted into good conditions. The group suggested that the cut-off date for planting corn in the area before significant yield losses may be observed is May 31<sup>st</sup>. If the forecast is correct and it rains again on Thursday growers will make the decision to switch from corn to soybeans this week.   Some fields are now emerging, with significant emergence expected this week. There were some reports of growers who were planning to plant green that are not able to plant their corn as a result of the ground not drying out. There have been a few damage reports in corn to Agricorp due to the seed rotting in the ground on some of the earlier planted fields primarily in the Chatham-Kent area. Some initial lab results on soil nitrate levels suggests that nitrate levels may be lower (6-7 ppm) compared to other years at this time of year which are typically in the 10-11 ppm range.</p> <p><strong>Soybeans: </strong>Soybean planting began the end of last week and went into the Victoria Day long weekend with some areas being 60-70% complete while others are less than 30% complete. Areas with heavier soils have a lower percentage of soybeans planted bringing the overall planting to 35% complete across the province. Many of the soybeans were planted into good conditions with some of the earlier planted fields beginning to emerge. However, some areas did receive heavy rains shortly after planting and stands may need to be assessed to determine population counts. Ontario research has found that a 33% reduction in the stand, distributed uniformly over the field, will not significantly affect yield. If the plant stand is more than 90,000 plants/acre in 7.5 inch rows do not replant the stand. Heavy clay soils need a minimum of 110,000 plants/acre before a replant should be considered. Fields that were planted last week but did not receive a burndown either last fall or this spring are seeing some very large Canada fleabane. There are no control options once the beans have emerged. Tank mixes with Eragon can be applied up to 3 days after planting. Once soybeans have been planted for more than 3 days Eragon will need to be taken out of the tank and options for controlling this weed become limited. Growers are encouraged to control this weed in the fall or in the spring prior to planting for optimum control. If best management practices have been used but the weather does not allow for herbicide application uncontrollable weeds that cause yield losses are considered an insurable peril.</p> <p><strong>Wheat: </strong>Stripe rust is not moving as fast as last year and continues to remain at low levels in fields of susceptible varieties. Overall disease pressure is relatively low with many growers having applied an early season fungicide. Wheat has begun heading out in Essex County while most wheat in this area is at swollen boot to awns starting to poke through. With the weather forecast calling for significant rain events, growers are advised to scout their fields, note the weather forecast and as well as DONcast to best coordinate FHB fungicide application at flowering. Growers are reminded that they should not apply a strobilurin based fungicide on wheat from the boot stage and later. Use medium or coarse droplets. Fine droplets will not penetrate the canopy. Sulphur deficiency continues to be an issue this year with fields still showing signs of deficiency. Previous research has demonstrated yield losses when S deficiency was not corrected so growers are encouraged to apply sulphur to their wheat crop as they continue to push nitrogen rates and there is reduced atmospheric deposition. Cereal leaf beetle has been found at threshold in Waterloo County with other areas showing signs of feeding but have not yet reached threshold. There have been damage reports in winter wheat after some of the heavy rains received left water standing in fields.</p> <p><strong>Forages: </strong>Given response to sulphur in cereals this spring, attention should also be paid to S nutrition on alfalfa, which can be very responsive to S as well. Some leaf diseases are being reported in forages. If fungicides are being used, the greatest response to yield appears to be when fungicides are applied at least 21 days prior to cutting and in fields that are intensively managed. There are also varietal differences in response to fungicide applications in alfalfa. Remember to follow the pre-harvest interval which is typically 14 days. There were reports of a few growers starting forage harvest due to low feed supplies or growers that are aiming to make more than 3 cuts per year. Seed supply for forage oats and peas is tight so if you are in need of seed it should be ordered as soon as possible. It is also important to ensure you are selecting the proper varieties of oats and peas when growing them for high quality forages.</p> <p><strong>Edible Beans: </strong>Research on the optimum planting date has shown that the optimum planting date is often very weather dependent. There is no advantage to planting edible beans on May 20<sup>th</sup> over June 1<sup>st</sup> particularly if planting is followed by a heavy rain event. If the forecast is calling for heavy rain events immediately after you are able to plant, consider holding off.</p> <p><strong>Agricorp Dates:</strong></p> <p>June 15: Last day to report unseeded acreage.</p> <p>June 30: Spring seeded final acreage reports due.</p> <p>July 10: Premiums</p> <p>Report Damage as soon as it occurs.</p> <p><strong>Meeting Minutes: </strong>Previous meeting minutes are posted on: Field Crop News Website – http://fieldcropnews.com/</p> <p><strong>Upcoming Events:</strong></p> <p>Southwest Crop Diagnostic Days – July 5 and 6, 2017</p> <p>FarmSmart Expo – July 13</p> <p>Eastern Crops Day – July 19</p> <p><strong>Stratford Crop Technology Contacts:</strong></p> <p>Horst Bohner, <a href="mailto:horst.bohner@ontario.ca">horst.bohner@ontario.ca</a></p> <p>Joanna Follings, <a href="mailto:joanna.follings@ontario.ca">joanna.follings@ontario.ca</a></p> <p>Meghan Moran, <a href="mailto:meghan.moran@ontario.ca">meghan.moran@ontario.ca</a></p> <p>Jake Munroe, <a href="mailto:jake.munroe@ontario.ca">jake.munroe@ontario.ca</a></p> </div> http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/exeter-agribusiness-minutes-may-23-2017/feed/ 0 2017-05-24 15:59 +00:00 2017-05-24 11:59 -04:00 http://fieldcropnews.com/?p=13763 http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/alfalfa-weevil-alert/ Baute Bug Blog Uncategorized alfalfa weevil Alfalfa Weevil Alert Some field scouts are finding alfalfa weevil above threshold in Niagara and Haldimand counties, though there are likely more fields in other counties at levels of concern.  Alfalfa weevil activity usually coincides with first cut but in some years when the crop is slower to develop, the weevil damage gets ahead, causing significant damage before first cut can happen. Alfalfa... Wed, 24 May 2017 02:41:57 Z http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/alfalfa-weevil-alert/#respond Tracey Baute <div class="pf-content"><div id="attachment_13764" style="width: 310px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/alfalfa-weevil-alert/alfalfa-weevil-larva/" rel="attachment wp-att-13764"><img class="size-medium wp-image-13764" src="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/alfalfa-weevil-larva-300x229.jpg" alt="Alfalfa weevil larva and damage. T Baute, OMAFRA" width="300" height="229" srcset="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/alfalfa-weevil-larva-300x229.jpg 300w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/alfalfa-weevil-larva-768x585.jpg 768w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/alfalfa-weevil-larva-1024x780.jpg 1024w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/alfalfa-weevil-larva.jpg 1200w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a><p class="wp-caption-text">Alfalfa weevil larva and damage. T Baute, OMAFRA</p></div> <p>Some field scouts are finding alfalfa weevil above threshold in Niagara and Haldimand counties, though there are likely more fields in other counties at levels of concern.  Alfalfa weevil activity usually coincides with first cut but in some years when the crop is slower to develop, the weevil damage gets ahead, causing significant damage before first cut can happen.</p> <p>Alfalfa weevil larvae are pale to bright green, with a black head and white stripe down the centre of the back. They initially feed within the leaf buds and then move to the tips of the plant. Pinholes are the first signs of damage but can quickly progress to skeletonized leaves. Heavily damaged fields will look greyish white from a distance. Heavy feeding not only impacts yield but also reduces feed quality.</p> <p>Fields should be scouted twice a week.  Fields at greater risk and therefore should be scouted first include those seeded last year, pure alfalfa stands, and areas of the field with south facing slopes.</p> <p>While walking an M shaped pattern across the field, collect 30 stems by cutting or breaking them off at ground level. Measure the height of the plants.  Then using a white pail, shake each plant against the side to knock off the larvae.  Count only the 3rd and 4th instar larvae. Smaller 1st and 2nd instar larvae are pale yellow and lack the white stripe along their bodies. Don&#8217;t count larvae that are slow moving and are tan or yellow in colour, they are infected by a fungus or parasitoids and will die shortly.</p> <p style="padding-left: 60px;"><strong>Action Thresholds</strong></p> <p style="padding-left: 60px;"><strong>No action required: </strong></p> <p style="padding-left: 90px;">&lt; 1 active larvae per stem (but continue to monitor)</p> <p style="padding-left: 60px;"><strong>Action required:</strong></p> <p style="padding-left: 60px;">&gt; 1 active larva per stem AND alfalfa &lt; 30 cm (12 in) tall</p> <p style="padding-left: 60px;">2 or more active larvae per stem AND alfalfa &lt; 40 cm (16 in) tall</p> <p style="padding-left: 60px;">&gt; 3 active larvae at any height.</p> <p><strong>Cultural Control: </strong>If the timing is right and the crop is ready, cutting the crop is the preferred and effective method of control, avoiding the costs of spraying and risk to pollinators and natural enemies. Cutting removes large numbers of larvae while larvae left in the field usually dry out and starve. That said, in heavy infestations, larvae can stick around and cause damage to the early growth of the second crop so scouting is recommended again after first cut.</p> <p>Cutting before the bud stage, however, can result in extensive damage to second cut regrowth and lower yield. If the crop is not ready to cut, insecticides are the recommended control option.</p> <p><strong>Insecticides: </strong>Registered products are listed <a href="http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/crops/pub812/pub812ch3.pdf" target="_blank">here</a>.  Spray in the evenings to avoid harming foraging bees and contact local beekeepers prior to spraying so that they can move or protect the hives during the spray.  Pay close attention to the days to harvest intervals when selecting and using these products.</p> </div> http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/alfalfa-weevil-alert/feed/ 0 2017-05-24 02:41 +00:00 2017-05-23 22:41 -04:00 http://fieldcropnews.com/?p=13749 http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/winchester-ag-breakfast-meeting-notes-may-23-2017/ Ag Business Minutes Winchester Ag Breakfast Meeting Notes – May 23, 2017 General conditions The rain over the weekend dropped 3-10 mm across the region. Some fields are now a bit too wet to work, but most farmers are able to spread fertilizer or spray. From the 1st of May, we have now accumulated 220 crop heat units (CHU), about 50 below the 30-year average of 270 CHU. The 30-year average for... Tue, 23 May 2017 19:44:06 Z http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/winchester-ag-breakfast-meeting-notes-may-23-2017/#respond OMAFRA Field Crop Team <div class="pf-content"><p><strong>General conditions</strong></p> <p>The rain over the weekend dropped 3-10 mm across the region. Some fields are now a bit too wet to work, but most farmers are able to spread fertilizer or spray.</p> <p>From the 1<sup>st</sup> of May, we have now accumulated 220 crop heat units (CHU), about 50 below the 30-year average of 270 CHU. The 30-year average for cumulative rainfall to this point in the season is 55 mm, whereas 135 mm have been recorded in the Ottawa area.</p> <p><strong>Forages</strong></p> <p>No further stand losses were reported since the May 9<sup>th</sup> meeting. Agricorp has only received 5 damage reports, mostly on new forages seeded last year. Some concerns were noted about the lack of stored forages, with most predicting low first cut yields. This shortage of available forage is leading some to keep fields that would otherwise be replanted. Some new forage seeding stands have had areas that needed to be re-seeded.</p> <p><strong>Cereals</strong></p> <p>Winter wheat is progressing well, with most in stem-elongation stage with flag leaves visible. Survival has been good, and less than 10% of acres will be switched to different crops.</p> <p>Most second nitrogen applications have been performed, and many fields have already had herbicide applied. Those that haven’t will likely be sprayed this week or the next.</p> <p>Spring cereals stands are looking good, with the exception of depressions in early-planted fields where water ponding caused heavy crusting and drowned seeds. These areas are mostly being selectively re-seeded, though the crusting has often required some tillage or rotary hoeing to allow seeders to penetrate.</p> <p><strong>Corn</strong></p> <p>Corn planting was estimated to be 30-80% completed, with less acres planted in the Brockville to Belleville area as there were fewer days with suitable conditions. Around the Ottawa area, most estimates were closer to 80% planted. Crusting has been a problem in early planted fields especially along the headlands and has required additional tillage or rotary hoeing. The recent gentle rains are helping to reduce the crusting and improve emergence.</p> <p>About 10-15% of corn acreage has been switched to shorter season hybrids, with most 100-day hybrids having been returned. Not much switching to soybeans was reported, though some producers are modifying rotation plans to plant corn again in earlier-drying fields. Seed supply is good.</p> <p><strong>Soybean</strong></p> <p>So far 15-20% of soybean acres have been planted, and some early plantings have already emerged. Large seed continues to be problematic, with at least one case of switching to smaller seed because of damage from planting equipment. Adjusting equipment is important for establishing proper populations. There is still seed available, but variety choices might be limited.</p> <p>Acreage planned for IP soybeans is down and by as much as 50% in Grenville and Dundas Counties, reflecting lower market premiums, difficulties securing contracts, and residual frustrations from the previous season.</p> <p><strong>Markets</strong></p> <p>Old crop corn is strong at $200 per tonne, largely thanks to the continued weakness of the Canadian dollar. New crop corn is at $205 per tonne, but many producers are still hesitant to sell at this price.</p> <p>The premium for non-GMO soybean is low at the moment at about $55 per tonne over Roundup-ready.</p> <p>Flooding is still affecting some US states, but most are on par with average years. Contacts in Wisconsin have reported that the price of urea increased by $20, largely because high water levels in the Mississippi River have delayed shipping barges.</p> <p><strong>Pesticides</strong></p> <p>Pre-emergence herbicides have already been applied to corn acres. Later applications and weather conditions to this point have been conducive to herbicide efficacy, leading to predictions of less re-spraying compared to last year. Herbicide supply is not an issue.</p> <p><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/fieldhorsetailv.jpg"><img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-13751" src="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/fieldhorsetailv.jpg" alt="fieldhorsetailv" width="188" height="220" /></a>There was some discussion on horsetail, which is quite visible this season, especially in the margins of low-lying fields with fine-textured, acid soils. Horsetail is notoriously difficult to control, in part due to its deep and extensive root system including rhizomes. Though aesthetically problematic for some, horsetail is generally not competitive with healthy field crop stands. A comprehensive overview of the biology and control of field horsetail <a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/EQUAR_PWB.pdf" target="_blank">can be found here</a> which is a chapter excerpt from the <a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/03/problem-weed-guide/" target="_blank">Problem Weed Guide for Ontario Crops </a>. Additionally, the following control options are from the Guide to Weed Control, Publication 75:</p> <p><strong>Field </strong><strong>Corn – Conventional</strong></p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">Either OPTION 2.25 OD at 1.56 L/ha (0.63 L/acre), ULTIM at 33 g/ha (13 g/ac) + non-ionic surfactant at 0.2% v/v, ACCENT at 33 g/ha (13 g/ac) + non-ionic surfactant at 0.2% v/v or BROADSTRIKE RC have activity on field horsetail but effectiveness varies greatly by population.</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">Expectation for control: 40%–70%</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">The most effective herbicide treatment for field horsetail in recent University of Guelph research has been the combination of BROADSTIKE RC at 62.5 g/ha (25 g/ac) + MCPA Amine (500 g/L) at 1 L/ha (0.4 L/acre). However, this treatment MUST be applied before the 4 leaf stage of corn to minimize crop injury and yield loss. When this tank-mix combination has been applied to corn past the 4 leaf stage, significant crop injury occurs and has resulted in yield losses as great as 1.9 MT/ha (30 bu/acre), which was more than any yield loss associated with field horsetail competition.</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">Expectation for control: 80%</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;"><strong>Corn – Herbicide Tolerant</strong></p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">Field horsetail is fairly tolerant to glyphosate. In glyphosate tolerant (“Roundup Ready”) corn the tank-mix of, glyphosate + BROADSTIKE RC at 62.5 g/ha (25 g/ac) + MCPA Amine (500 g/L) at 1 L/ha (0.4 L/acre). However, this treatment MUST be applied before the 4 leaf stage of corn to minimize crop injury and yield loss. When this tank-mix combination has been applied to corn past the 4 leaf stage, significant crop injury occurs and has resulted in yield losses as great as 1.9 MT/ha (30 bu/acre), which was more than any yield loss associated with field horsetail competition.</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">Expectation for control: 80%</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;"><strong>Soybeans – Conventional or Herbicide Tolerant</strong></p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">Glyphosate (360 g/L) at 2.5 L/ha (1 L/acre) + BROADSTRIKE RC at 87.5 g/ha (35 g/ac) applied preplant to soybeans has provided the best control of field horsetail. However, susceptibility of field horsetail to this treatment varies significantly by population.</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">Expectation for control: 45%–99%</p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;"><strong>Cereals </strong></p> <p style="padding-left: 30px;">Comparative trials have shown that any cereal herbicide that contains the active ingredient MCPA will provide very effective top growth control of field horsetail.</p> <p><strong>Other</strong></p> <p>Some problems have been noted with the fluency agent for neonicotinoid-treated seed gumming up planters. It is unclear whether this is a result of moister conditions or a change in product formulation.</p> <p><strong>Crop Insurance Update</strong></p> <p>More producers have signed up for crop insurance this year in both field crops and forages, likely due to the difficult season many had last year.</p> <p><strong>2017 Planting deadlines, see:</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.agricorp.com/SiteCollectionDocuments/PID-PlantingDates-SpringGandO-en.pdf">http://www.agricorp.com/SiteCollectionDocuments/PID-PlantingDates-SpringGandO-en.pdf</a></p> <p>Page Content</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td><strong>Deadline</strong></td> <td><strong>Description</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td>June 15, 2017</td> <td> <ul> <li>Report damage for USAB</li> </ul> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>June 30, 2017</td> <td> <ul> <li>Report acreage</li> </ul> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>July 10, 2017</td> <td> <ul> <li>Pay premium</li> </ul> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>December 15, 2017</td> <td> <ul> <li>Report yield</li> </ul> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>Upcoming Field Days:</strong></p> <p>Southwest Crop Diagnostic Days &#8211; July 5-6 (Ridgetown College) &#8211; diagnosticdays.ca</p> <p>FarmSmart Expo &#8211; July 13 (Elora Research Station) &#8211; farmsmartconference.com</p> <p>Eastern Crops Day &#8211; July 20 (Winchester Research Station) &#8211; eocdd.eastontcropconference.ca</p> <h6>Canola Crop Tour &#8211; July 14, 10 am to 3 pm, (Barclay Dick &amp; Sons Farm Supply, 4139 AB Highway 60, Douglas) &#8211; <a href="https://www.ontariocanolagrowers.ca/">https://www.ontariocanolagrowers.ca/</a></h6> <h6></h6> <p><em>Thank you to Stephanie Nanne, P.T. Sullivan Agro for taking notes for this morning’s meeting.</em></p> </div> http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/winchester-ag-breakfast-meeting-notes-may-23-2017/feed/ 0 2017-05-23 19:44 +00:00 2017-05-23 15:44 -04:00 http://fieldcropnews.com/?p=13739 http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/ontario-field-crop-report-may-18-2017/ Crop Reports Ontario Field Crop Report – May 18, 2017 By: THE OMAFRA FIELD CROP TEAM Winter Wheat: Early planted winter wheat continues to look better than Thanksgiving wheat. The cool, wet weather has slowed the rate of wheat development to 5 to 7 days ahead of normal. Most of the crop is at the flag leaf stage, however crop development ranges from 1st node to heads emerging. Cooler, wet... Tue, 23 May 2017 15:27:56 Z http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/ontario-field-crop-report-may-18-2017/#respond OMAFRA Field Crop Team <div class="pf-content"><div class="mceTemp"></div> <p>By: THE OMAFRA FIELD CROP TEAM</p> <p>Winter Wheat:<br /> Early planted winter wheat continues to look better than Thanksgiving wheat. The cool, wet weather has slowed the rate of wheat development to 5 to 7 days ahead of normal. Most of the crop is at the flag leaf stage, however crop development ranges from 1st node to heads emerging. Cooler, wet conditions have continued to keep disease pressure relatively low, but have also resulted in parts of some fields turn yellow (wet feet). Some 1st and 2nd applications of nitrogen are still being applied. Aerial applications of nitrogen are being considered on heavy clay soils in the Niagara area. Yield loss has not been observed in the past when similar conditions occurred. If sulphur deficiency showing, apply now.<br /> Septoria leaf spot and powdery mildew are the most common diseases and primarily situated in the lower canopy but on some susceptible varieties moving up. Keep scouting but in most fields fungicide can wait for T3 timing at heading. Leaf rust is has been identified in some fields. Stripe rust over the past week has been found in Oxford, Chatham-Kent, Elgin and Bruce counties; but at low levels. The disease is not moving as fast as last year.<br /> Spring cereals:<br /> Early planted fields have emerged while planting continues as field conditions allow.</p> <p>Corn:<br /> As of May 17, corn planting in Ontario is at about 30% completed; however there are several areas where wet soils have prevented planting, or where rain has slowed planting. Earliest April planted corn is at the 2 leaf stage but most early planted corn is struggling to emerge. The calendar is pushing some planting to occur into soils that are wetter than ideal.<br /> Planting date and yield potential research (U of Guelph, Deen and Hooker) shows that 95% of potential corn yield can be achieved at Elora where corn is planted May 20; at Exeter where corn is planted May 25 and Ridgetown where corn is planted May 30.<br /> With the increase in cover crop biomass, watch for black cutworm as corn starts to emerge and through early corn growth. Larvae will cut off the plant just below ground level and patches of affected plants will appear wilted from hollowed out stems. Figure 1 shows a wilted plant affected by cutworm. Cutworm larvae can be found near affected plants below the soil surface. Further information black cutworm damage and control can be accessed at. http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/watch-for-black-cutworm-as-corn-starts-to-emerge/</p> <div id="attachment_13747" style="width: 310px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/P1040947-cutworm-in-corn.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-13747" src="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/P1040947-cutworm-in-corn-300x225.jpg" alt="igure 1: A wilted young corn plant damaged by black cutworm cutting the stem just below the soil surface. Small patches are common where weeds and over-wintering cover crops are present in fields in early spring attracting egg-laying moths. " width="300" height="225" srcset="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/P1040947-cutworm-in-corn-300x225.jpg 300w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/P1040947-cutworm-in-corn-768x576.jpg 768w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/P1040947-cutworm-in-corn-1024x768.jpg 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a><p class="wp-caption-text">Figure 1: A wilted young corn plant damaged by black cutworm cutting the stem just below the soil surface. Small patches are common where weeds and over-wintering cover crops are present in fields in early spring attracting egg-laying moths.</p></div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Soybeans:<br /> A few fields of soybeans have been planted, but planted acres will increase quickly with forecast warmer temperatures and ideal soil conditions. Soybeans planted 3 weeks ago are knuckling but have not emerged. Monitor slow to emerge fields for seedcorn maggot damage, especially where manure or cover crops have been incorporated.<br /> Canola:<br /> Planting of spring canola is in full swing with approximately 20% of intended acres planted. Winter canola fields are in bloom.</p> <p>Cover Crops:<br /> Fall cover crop growth exceeded expectations, resulting in some fields with higher volumes of residue to manage. Soils can be slower to dry, or where cover crops are still growing, they can reduce soil moisture in the top few inches of soil resulting in conditions that are more difficult to plant into.</p> <p>Forage and Pasture:<br /> Cereal Rye fields are being harvested as a forage crop with higher than expected yields. Alfalfa forage crops are still short, but a few warm days will make a big difference in growth. A few fields have been harvested due to shortage of feed or rotation to corn. Dairy first cut will begin the last week of May. Although there have not been reports of alfalfa weevil damage, scouting for leaf feeding and where found, scheduling earlier harvest, is important.</p> <p>Weed Control:<br /> When growing IP soybeans, a preemergence herbicide program is preferred as it has typically provided the best weed control and return on investment in University of Guelph trials. As the season progresses, some producers may decide to plant first and worry about weed control later. A stretch of windy or rainy weather can easily take you out of that preemergence window. Timing of postemergence herbicides in IP soybeans is critical since control is significantly reduced once weeds get beyond the 6 leaf stage of growth. Traditionally, the ideal timing of postemergence herbicide applications have been around 3 weeks after planting with scouting for weeds beginning at 10-14 days after planting.</p> </div> http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/ontario-field-crop-report-may-18-2017/feed/ 0 2017-05-23 15:27 +00:00 2017-05-23 11:27 -04:00 http://fieldcropnews.com/?p=13678 http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/mount-forest-ag-breakfast-meeting-may-16th-2017/ Ag Business Minutes Mount Forest Ag Breakfast Meeting – May 16th, 2017 General: Despite recent weather conditions (cool, wet), things have turned around and activity has started back in the field with manure application, wheat management and corn planting. Field conditions for the most part are okay and dust is even been flying in some places. Most farmers have been patient in getting back on the land to avoid compaction and planting into less... Thu, 18 May 2017 18:07:48 Z http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/mount-forest-ag-breakfast-meeting-may-16th-2017/#respond OMAFRA Field Crop Team <div class="pf-content"><p><strong>General: </strong>Despite recent weather conditions (cool, wet), things have turned around and activity has started back in the field with manure application, wheat management and corn planting. Field conditions for the most part are okay and dust is even been flying in some places. Most farmers have been patient in getting back on the land to avoid compaction and planting into less than ideal conditions. Areas with heavier clay soils like Peel/Halton and Niagara have struggled to get field work done, including nitrogen (N) application on wheat in Niagara region. Canada Fleabane is showing up where it really hasn’t been noticed before.  People surprised by how dense it is in some fields where they didn’t expect it. Purple deadnettle and henbit has been very prominent this year, whereas in previous years it has been very sparse.</p> <p><strong>Crop Insurance: </strong>Winter wheat complaints have dropped off considerably. A <a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/2017-PID-Planting-Dates-Spring-G-and-O.pdf" target="_blank">new map has been issued for planting date deadlines for spring cereals</a>. Changes to the deadlines have been made in eastern Ontario. No deadline for new forage seedings as likely anytime is okay based on the perennial nature of the crop. Issue is just how many cuts you get in establishment year. Final planting date deadline for most crops in Ontario is June 30<sup>th</sup> (while specific crops have deadlines earlier than that). <a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/2017-PID-Planting-Dates-Spring-G-and-O.pdf" target="_blank">See attachment.</a></p> <p><strong>Wheat: </strong>In general the wheat looks good. Most would be in the full flag leaf stage (Zadok’s  37-39). There are some pockets of “tough” wheat either because of lack of N due to wet field conditions, or burn injury caused by some spray applications made during the frosty period of the previous week. This is worse if tank-mixing was done but in almost all cases the crop will grow out of it and unlikely to be a yield penalty. Some yellowing of fields also associated with cool damp soils and air temps that have slowed growth. A wheat plant specimen was brought in for discussion, the consensus was that the very poor looking plant (stunted, yellowing, brittle, not much tillering) is likely due to lack of sulphur.  There has been lots of twitter chatter about the response of wheat to S and where there are misses in sprayer path, you can really see the need for it.</p> <p>There are still enough fields without N application due to clay soils that just have not been “fit”! these fields are at or approaching flag leaf. Question asked about whether N application can still happen. Concensus is that befits of application will occur right to the end but rate needs to be adjusted based on predicted yield potential with the later stage of the crop. Best to switch to a dry N form if you have access to urea spinner spreader. This will avoid leaf burn to the all important flag leaf. N applications at these late stages if done with 28% should absolutely avoid tank-mixes with other products to minimize damage to the flag leaf.</p> <p>While significant number of fields without herbicide application, the group feels the late timing currently doesn’t justify spraying. What damage those weeds were going to have on yield potential has occurred, not worth the application expense for the cleanup only. Also with later applications and tank mix considerations, a strobie and a bromoxynil product likely to cause unacceptable injury. Disease pressure continues to be low with powdery mildew and some septoria in the lower canopy. However the discovery of stripe rust in a few locations and the anticipation of warmer weather means most people should seriously consider a foliar fungicide ahead of fusarium head blight control treatments at heading.</p> <p>NOTE: Dr. Ali Navabi, University of Guelph Cereal Breeder at Guelph doing work on stripe rust and interested in knowing specific locations where it is detected. Contact at Dr. Navabi at <a href="mailto:anavabi@uoguelph.ca">anavabi@uoguelph.ca</a></p> <p><strong>Spring Cereals: </strong>There are areas of intended acreage not planted, deadline for crop insurance has been extended in eastern regions of Ontario. While that which has been planted has been into soil reasonably fit, emergence has been slow with the cool soil temperatures. There is some more acreage planned so those that need the feed/bedding will continue to plant, and weather this week should allow it to get in.</p> <p><strong>Corn: </strong>Planted acres as of Tuesday the 16<sup>th</sup> ranged from upwards of 40% closer to London, to 25% +/- further north and west, and very little to the east end of the region. Seeding is patchy as a function of where more rain fell. Perth is behind Huron, and ahead of Bruce, Grey Simcoe etc. Many small to medium sized operations are done while the larger operations are well behind. Those larger operations are also saying those first couple of hundred acres were not planted into “fit” soil conditions. For the most part went in well but still concern over some that was planted Friday-Saturday just before the cold rain of two weeks ago. There has been a single damage claim for replant. Only one replant in corn has been known to the group where 4 inches of rain pounded the ground. Those acres previously planted have not emerged for the most part, have to get close to London for find emerged corn. Very little maturity switching has occurred and unlikely to now. Most farmers were not pushing the hybrid maturities that much.</p> <p><strong>Forages: </strong>Spring plantings done under pretty good conditions and a bit more still to be planted with intention still to plant. Depending on the area upwards of 90% of intended plantings are in place.</p> <p>Established crop progress has been delayed by the cool/wet weather. Only one field cut to the best of the groups knowledge within the region.</p> <p>With some of this springs seedings, the soil has crusted over due to the rainfall. This has slowed emergence. Unlike beans, do not harrow forage seedings to improve emergence. The seeds are planted close to the surface and the cotyledons of alfalfa are very brittle and easily susceptible to damage.</p> <p><strong>Weed Control</strong></p> <p><strong>Control Strategies for Canada Fleabane: </strong>Herbicide choices to control glyphosate resistant Canada fleabane was a big part of the discussion Tuesday. <a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/ERICA_PWB_2017.pdf" target="_blank">The following document</a> is an excerpt from the <a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/03/problem-weed-guide/" target="_blank">Problem Weed Guide for Ontario Crops</a> that discusses management strategies for this weed.</p> <div id="attachment_13725" style="width: 1034px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/IMG_8469.jpg"><img class="size-large wp-image-13725" src="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/IMG_8469-1024x683.jpg" alt="A mix of larger. fall germinated Canada fleabane compared to the smaller, spring germinated seedlings. Picture taken in early May of 2016 in Norfolk County." width="1024" height="683" srcset="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/IMG_8469-1024x683.jpg 1024w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/IMG_8469-300x200.jpg 300w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/IMG_8469-768x512.jpg 768w" sizes="(max-width: 1024px) 100vw, 1024px" /></a><p class="wp-caption-text">A mix of larger. fall germinated Canada fleabane compared to the smaller, spring germinated seedlings. Picture taken in early May of 2016 in Norfolk County.</p></div> <p><strong>What is that purple flowering weed? </strong>More presence of henbit and purple dead nettle this year. They are winter annuals so are quite large by now. Tillage and/or burndown or glyphosate programs will control them but the size may require action before main weed control program applications. These weeds are harder to control when they flower (like most weeds) and label timing is 4-6 leaf stage which usually is present by late fall. The <a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/2016/09/weed-id-guide-for-ontario-crops/" target="_blank">Weed ID Guide for Ontario Crops</a> have both of these species listed on page 132 (henbit) and 134 (deadnettle).</p> <div id="attachment_13713" style="width: 778px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMAM_3.jpg"><img class="size-large wp-image-13713" src="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMAM_3-768x1024.jpg" alt="Flowering henbit" width="768" height="1024" srcset="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMAM_3-768x1024.jpg 768w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMAM_3-225x300.jpg 225w" sizes="(max-width: 768px) 100vw, 768px" /></a><p class="wp-caption-text">Flowering henbit</p></div> <div id="attachment_13717" style="width: 1034px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMPU_5.jpg"><img class="size-large wp-image-13717" src="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMPU_5-1024x683.jpg" alt="A patch of purple deadnettle in Haldimand county during mid-May" width="1024" height="683" srcset="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMPU_5-1024x683.jpg 1024w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMPU_5-300x200.jpg 300w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMPU_5-768x512.jpg 768w" sizes="(max-width: 1024px) 100vw, 1024px" /></a><p class="wp-caption-text">A patch of purple deadnettle in Haldimand county during mid-May</p></div> <div id="attachment_13715" style="width: 1034px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMPU_4.jpg"><img class="size-large wp-image-13715" src="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMPU_4-1024x683.jpg" alt="Purple deadnettle beginning to flower in April" width="1024" height="683" srcset="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMPU_4-1024x683.jpg 1024w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMPU_4-300x200.jpg 300w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMPU_4-768x512.jpg 768w" sizes="(max-width: 1024px) 100vw, 1024px" /></a><p class="wp-caption-text">Purple deadnettle beginning to flower in April</p></div> <div id="attachment_13711" style="width: 1034px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMAM_2.jpg"><img class="size-large wp-image-13711" src="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMAM_2-1024x768.jpg" alt="Henbit growing within a corn crop from 2016" width="1024" height="768" srcset="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMAM_2-1024x768.jpg 1024w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMAM_2-300x225.jpg 300w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMAM_2-768x576.jpg 768w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/LAMAM_2.jpg 1280w" sizes="(max-width: 1024px) 100vw, 1024px" /></a><p class="wp-caption-text">Henbit growing within a corn crop from 2016</p></div> <p><b>Tank-mixing:</b> A reminder to never tank-mix fertilizers and additives to herbicides unless there is experience and a proven track record with their performance. The following photo is a replication of a 2016 field scenario where a producer tank-mixed a &#8220;crop enhancer&#8221; with glyphosate. The additive contained many cations, which are known to antagonize glyphosate and reduce weed control.</p> <div id="attachment_13709" style="width: 970px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/CHEAL_micronutrient-affect_PESTPATROL_figure1.jpg"><img class="size-full wp-image-13709" src="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/CHEAL_micronutrient-affect_PESTPATROL_figure1.jpg" alt="Lamb's-quarter response to glyphosate and glyphosate + a crop enhancer (which contained many divalent cations) compared to an un-sprayed plant." width="960" height="720" srcset="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/CHEAL_micronutrient-affect_PESTPATROL_figure1.jpg 960w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/CHEAL_micronutrient-affect_PESTPATROL_figure1-300x225.jpg 300w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/CHEAL_micronutrient-affect_PESTPATROL_figure1-768x576.jpg 768w" sizes="(max-width: 960px) 100vw, 960px" /></a><p class="wp-caption-text">Lamb&#8217;s-quarter response to glyphosate and glyphosate + a crop enhancer (which contained many divalent cations) compared to an un-sprayed plant.</p></div> <p><strong>Soybeans</strong></p> <p>Less than 5% in but there are guys who have switched to soybeans based on fields for that crop are ready while corn fields need a couple of days to get fit. As the weather breaks anticipation is that guys will throw everything at the ground and those that can will be planting corn and beans at the same time. Everything is going to happen fast. This will put lots of pressure on the retail trade to meet the logistic needs for planting, fertilizing and spraying the corn and soybean crops.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/mount-forest-ag-breakfast-meeting-may-16th-2017/feed/ 0 2017-05-18 18:07 +00:00 2017-05-18 14:07 -04:00 http://fieldcropnews.com/?p=13698 http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/2017-ridgetown-ag-breakfast-meeting-minutes-may-16-2017/ Ag Business Minutes 2017 Ridgetown Ag Breakfast Meeting Minutes (May 16, 2017) Breakfast Sponsor: Thanks from the group to “Roger Bourassa – Dupont Pioneer” Quote of the week &#8211; “Lambton County – The Breadbasket of Ontario” from Chad Anderson in his customary introduction. Synopsis: Not much has happened over most of the past two weeks.  Most are patient but some have started to push soil conditions especially closer to London. The cool... Wed, 17 May 2017 16:22:50 Z http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/2017-ridgetown-ag-breakfast-meeting-minutes-may-16-2017/#respond OMAFRA Field Crop Team <div class="pf-content"><p><strong>Breakfast Sponsor: Thanks from the group to “Roger Bourassa – Dupont Pioneer” </strong></p> <p><strong>Quote of the week</strong> &#8211; <strong>“Lambton County – The Breadbasket of Ontario”</strong> from Chad Anderson in his customary introduction.</p> <p><strong>Synopsis: </strong>Not much has happened over most of the past two weeks.<strong>  </strong>Most are patient but some have started to push soil conditions especially closer to London. The cool wet weather has slowed corn planting and the development of the winter wheat crop. This is reflected in CHU which for Ridgetown is 77 CHU instead of the normal 200 CHU, London has had 70 CHU and 144 CHU in Windsor. Some corn was planted late last week and the past couple of days. (30% planted) mostly on lighter soils.  Planting on clay soils just started due to the frequent rains.  Nothing has changed for soybeans other than the odd field of soybeans planted a few weeks ago.  The bulk of sugarbeets are planted (90%).  Wheat stage ranges from head showing to flag leaf emerging. There have been reports of herbicide/fungicide application injury in wheat. The hay crop is looking good.</p> <p><strong>Winter Wheat: </strong>Early planted winter wheat still looks better than Thanksgiving wheat.  The cool, wet weather has slowed the rate of wheat development.  Wheat is 5 to 7 days ahead of normal with crop ranging from head emerging to flag leaf. In some areas flag leaf fungicide applications are completed. Cool, wet weather has made some fields or parts turn yellow (wet feet) as well as slowed late application N uptake.  Yield loss has not been observed in the past when similar conditions occurred.  If sulphur deficiency is showing, apply now.  Spring cereal seed fields are being planted.</p> <p>Some fungicide-herbicide injury is occurring but important to keep promoting higher water volumes (15 gal min 20 gal is better). Injury can occur from N on wheat, if N is put on before the herbicide- fungicide so better to apply herbicide- fungicide first followed by N to reduce injury. Surfactants as well as the environmental condition causing a thin cuticle are contributing. The rate of surfactant can be reduced on some fungicides to manage injury. Many of the labels say 5C minimum temperature and it was hard to find that this year.  This has led to significant burn from 28% application on some varieties even after waiting up to a week after fungicide. It did however go on after very cool temps.  In Niagara, wet conditions have prevented the nitrogen application on wheat. Helicopters are being used to apply N (100lbs+/ac) in fields with no N now to be available for flowering.</p> <p>Septoria leaf spot and powdery mildew are the most common diseases and are primarily situated in the lower canopy but on some susceptible varieties they are moving up. There was more disease in the big wheat last fall than we are seeing this spring.  Keep scouting but in most cases fungicide is not needed and can wait for T3.  Remember strobilurin based fungicides should not be applied on wheat from the boot stage and later. Leaf rust has shown up in fields in area. Stripe rust over the past week has been found in Bright (Oxford), Ridgetown (Chatham-Kent), south of St. Thomas (Elgin) and Owen Sound (Bruce) but at low levels.  The disease is not moving as fast as last year. If you have stripe rust (no fungicide) please place in a paper bag and send to Albert (<a href="mailto:albert.tenuta@ontario.ca">albert.tenuta@ontario.ca</a>). The stripe rust race survey from last year showed two predominant races in Ontario which are similar to those in the Eastern Midwest states which differ slightly from the Great Plains races. Refer to the last Ridgetown Ag Breakfast minutes for previous stripe rust discussion.</p> <p><strong>Corn: </strong>Corn planting is at 30% in the area primarily between Dresden to Blenheim to West Elgin but corn planting on Merlin clays has started.  A number of corn fields have been planted along the 401 between Guelph and Ridgetown. The earliest corn planted on April 18<sup>th</sup> has spiked and a field planted April 20<sup>th</sup> is at the 2 leaf stage but most of the corn is struggling to emerge. There may be some replanting as rotary hoeing is taking place on some April planted corn.  Rain may help as well as the forecasted higher temperatures.</p> <p>The planting date and yield potential discussion brought out Hooker, U of G and Greg Stewart research showing one can expect 95% of corn yield at Elora when planted May 20, Exeter May 25, Ridgetown May 30.</p> <p>The dates to switch corn hybrids from the Agronomy Guide, OMAFRA publication 811: for areas with less than 2800 CHU switch hybrids May 15 to 20, for areas with 2800 to 3200 CHU May 20 to 25 and for areas with over 3200 CHU May 30 to early June.</p> <p>Consensus around the table was that 50 to 60% of corn was planted with sulphur (10 to 12 lbs S per acre) with most putting some sulphur on in starter. Doug Young (UG Ridgetown Campus) research shows there is no benefit to applying more than 15 lbs per acre of sulphur to the corn.</p> <p><strong>Soybeans:</strong> Soybeans planted 3 weeks ago are knuckling but have not emerged. A few fields of soybeans have been planted. For anybody who is not buying certified seed the seed size and quality is an issue. Be sure to check the germination. With soil temperatures at 10C the companies are not in a rush to plant seed soybeans.</p> <p><strong>Grad Students Attending (Thank you for the brief summaries):</strong></p> <p><strong>Brendan Metzger</strong> is a new MSc student with Dr. Peter Sikkema (University of Guelph – Ridgetown Campus), looking at the potential fit for tolpyralate as a new corn herbicide in Ontario. As part of my grad work we&#8217;ll be looking at tolpyralate rate response across several weed species, application timing, corn hybrid tolerance and its efficacy on glyphosate resistant Canada fleabane.</p> <p><strong>Horticultural Crops: </strong>Tomato planting began last Friday with the big push this week (Monday) and will keep going depending on the rain.  Could have 35-40% of acres planted this week if favourable weather. The Spray Hub App has had great response from producers with 85% growers entering timely spray application information.<strong>  </strong>Good example of spray stewardship!</p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Nearly 9,000 acres (90</strong>%) of sugarbeets are planted but stands are lighter (80 beets/100 feet of row) than normal (target 100+ beets/100 feet of row) on about 1000 acres.  It is not unusual to seed 200 beets/100 feet of row the last two years. Some replanting will occur. Fields planted before Easter are doing well.  There is not a lot of seedling disease. Sugarbeet growers are encouraged to rotate fungicides and never use triazoles alone or back to back which is important for cercospora leaf spot resistance management.  Frost stopped asparagus for 8 days</p> <p><strong>Dry Beans:</strong> Chris Gillard (UG Ridgetown Campus) planted first dry bean (azuki) trials in Exeter, Elora and Winchester.  Planting date study May 20, June 1, June 10 and June 20 found that June 1 was the best date. If there was a heavy rain then all dates better when planted after a 1” rain.</p> <p><strong>Cover Crops: </strong>Looking at cover crop fields some are drying out nicely and some are a little bit slower, mixtures the residue is standing up well and not creating a mat. Generally recommend 30 lbs/ac of oats for cover and higher rates if it is to be used for feed. There have been reports of rye drying out soil and making it hard.</p> <p><strong>Publications</strong>: There is a new Soil Health in Ontario publication which gives a good overview of soil health. There are a number of soil health factsheets that will be available soon. A new Problem Weed Control Guide is available from your local OMAFRA office. There are also a number of new disease publications and resource materials available. Contact Albert Tenuta to obtain copies.</p> <p><strong>Next Meeting:</strong> Ridgetown Agribusiness meetings are held in the Willson Hall Campus Centre (downstairs) at the University of Guelph Ridgetown Campus. Meetings start at 7:15 am with breakfast and every two weeks on Tuesdays.  Next meeting is May 30, 2017.</p> <p><strong>Upcoming Events</strong></p> <p>Southwest Crop Diagnostic Days (University of Guelph, Ridgetown Campus) July 5 or 6, 2017</p> <p>FarmSmart Expo 2017 (University of Guelph, Elora Research Station) &#8211; July 13, 2017</p> <p>Eastern Crops Day (U. of G., Winchester Research Farm) – July 19, 2017</p> <p>Summit on Canadian Soil Health 2017 – August 22 &amp; 23, Guelph</p> <p>Southwest Agricultural Conference – January 3 &amp; 4, 2018</p> </div> http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/2017-ridgetown-ag-breakfast-meeting-minutes-may-16-2017/feed/ 0 2017-05-17 16:22 +00:00 2017-05-17 12:22 -04:00 http://fieldcropnews.com/?p=13673 http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/cereal-leaf-beetle-and-true-armyworm-the-next-threats-for-wheat-and-other-crops/ Baute Bug Blog Corn Forages Spring wheat Uncategorized Winter Wheat cereal leaf beetle true armyworm Cereal Leaf Beetle and True Armyworm – the Next Threats for Wheat and Other Crops Two more pests deserve our attention over the next month. Cereal leaf beetle (CLB) is starting to show up in some fields in Ontario.  Levels are still low but both adults, eggs and/or larvae are being found by scouts at various locations during routine scouting trips.  A few locations tend to experience a higher frequency of infestations including fields near... Tue, 16 May 2017 17:15:50 Z http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/cereal-leaf-beetle-and-true-armyworm-the-next-threats-for-wheat-and-other-crops/#respond Tracey Baute <div class="pf-content"><div> <p>Two more pests deserve our attention over the next month.</p> <div id="attachment_13683" style="width: 160px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/cereal-leaf-beetle-and-true-armyworm-the-next-threats-for-wheat-and-other-crops/cereal-leaf-beetle-adult-jocelyn-smith-ugrc/" rel="attachment wp-att-13683"><img class="wp-image-13683 size-thumbnail" src="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cereal-Leaf-Beetle-Adult-Jocelyn-Smith-UGRC-150x150.jpg" alt="Cereal leaf beetle adult. J. Smith, UGRC" width="150" height="150" srcset="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cereal-Leaf-Beetle-Adult-Jocelyn-Smith-UGRC-150x150.jpg 150w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cereal-Leaf-Beetle-Adult-Jocelyn-Smith-UGRC-80x80.jpg 80w" sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" /></a><p class="wp-caption-text">Cereal leaf beetle adults have reddish orange heads and legs.  J. Smith, UGRC</p></div> <div id="attachment_13682" style="width: 160px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/cereal-leaf-beetle-and-true-armyworm-the-next-threats-for-wheat-and-other-crops/clb-eggs-susan-gowan/" rel="attachment wp-att-13682"><img class="wp-image-13682 size-thumbnail" src="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/CLB-eggs-Susan-Gowan-150x150.jpg" alt="Cereal leaf beetle eggs. S. Gowan, Gowan Crop Consulting" width="150" height="150" srcset="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/CLB-eggs-Susan-Gowan-150x150.jpg 150w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/CLB-eggs-Susan-Gowan-80x80.jpg 80w" sizes="(max-width: 150px) 100vw, 150px" /></a><p class="wp-caption-text">Cereal leaf beetle eggs.   S. Gowan, Gowan Crop Consulting</p></div> <p><strong>Cereal leaf beetle</strong> (CLB) is starting to show up in some fields in Ontario.  Levels are still low but both adults, eggs and/or larvae are being found by scouts at various locations during routine scouting trips.  A few locations tend to experience a higher frequency of infestations including fields near Dresden, Bolton, Stayner, Seaforth, and Clinton. But this does not mean that other fields in Ontario are not at risk.  Susan Gowan, a crop consultant in Haldimand, for example. is finding CLB more easily in that county over the last few weeks than in previous years.  Nothing of concern yet, but it does indicate that other areas not known for being a CLB hot spot should be scouted.  A detailed post on CLB from 2016, including scouting and thresholds can be found <a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/2016/05/stay-ahead-of-cereal-leaf-beetle/" target="_blank">here.</a></p> </div> <div> <div id="attachment_13690" style="width: 274px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/cereal-leaf-beetle-and-true-armyworm-the-next-threats-for-wheat-and-other-crops/armyworm_2007-copy-2/" rel="attachment wp-att-13690"><img class="size-medium wp-image-13690" src="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/armyworm_2007-copy-264x300.jpg" alt="True armyworm larvae. T. Baute, OMAFRA" width="264" height="300" srcset="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/armyworm_2007-copy-264x300.jpg 264w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/armyworm_2007-copy-768x873.jpg 768w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/armyworm_2007-copy.jpg 847w" sizes="(max-width: 264px) 100vw, 264px" /></a><p class="wp-caption-text">True armyworm larvae. T. Baute, OMAFRA</p></div> <p><strong>True armyworm</strong> is also expected to be a higher risk this year, given very early and higher than normal trap catches this spring, both here and in neighbouring states.</p> <p>Moths prefer to lay their eggs on grassy vegetation, including grassy weed species, cereals, mixed forages and grassy species of cover crops. Larvae hatch from the eggs and feed at night for approximately a month.  Full grown true armyworm are 4 cm (1 1⁄2 in.) long and are dull-green to brown in colour. No matter what colour they are, they always have white-bordered stripes running laterally along the body and to be true armyworm larvae, they must have dark diagonal bands at the top of each abdominal chubby proleg.</p> <p>There are two to three generations but the first generation is the most problematic here in Ontario.  Most feeding activity is done in June to early July but can start as early as late May.  In corn, larvae strip the leaf margins, but as they grow in size and numbers, can leave only the midribs left on the plants. As long as the growing point of the plant is not damaged, the corn plant will be able to recover from moderate feeding. In cereals and mixed forages, feeding begins on the leaf margins, but larvae may quickly move up the plant to feed on the kernels and awns or clip the wheat, timothy or other small grains heads completely off of the stem. Clipped heads can be found on the soil surface and can impact yield if taking place in many areas of the field.</p> <p>The best time to scout for true armyworm is shortly after dusk when larvae are actively feeding. In corn, examine 20 plants in five areas in the field (100 plants total). In cereals and mixed forages, examine 10 areas of the field, assessing the number of larvae per 30 cm<sup>2</sup> (1 ft<sup>2</sup>).  Pay particular attention to the border area directly adjacent to other grassy host crops. During the day, if it is cloudy and overcast, you might be lucky enough to see larvae in the whorl, leaf axil, or on the head of the plant but on sunny days, they will be down on the ground among the crop debris or under soil clods. Brown frass may also be present on the plants and on the soil surface.</p> <p>Keep on eye on <a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/">Field Crop News</a> for scouting alerts and refer to the <a href="http://gfo.ca/apps">Pest Manager app</a> and <a href="http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/crops/pub812/p812toc.html">OMAFRA Publication 812, Field Crop Protection Guide</a> for insecticide options.</div> <div></div> <div>Send me any reports of true armyworm sightings <a href="https://twitter.com/TraceyBaute" target="_blank">@TraceyBaute.</a>  Thresholds and Management Options will be covered in more detail in an upcoming blog.</div> </div> http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/cereal-leaf-beetle-and-true-armyworm-the-next-threats-for-wheat-and-other-crops/feed/ 0 2017-05-16 17:15 +00:00 2017-05-16 13:15 -04:00 http://fieldcropnews.com/?p=13665 http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/watch-for-black-cutworm-as-corn-starts-to-emerge/ Baute Bug Blog Corn black cutworm Watch for Black Cutworm As Corn Starts to Emerge The storm fronts that pushed up from the southern states over the last month not only carried rain with them but also carried in black cutworm moths. Trap catches have been higher than normal this year in neighbouring states, indicating a higher risk this spring for Ontario.  Once they arrive, the adult moths look for weedy green patches in fields... Mon, 15 May 2017 15:14:11 Z http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/watch-for-black-cutworm-as-corn-starts-to-emerge/#respond Tracey Baute <div class="pf-content"><div id="attachment_13669" style="width: 310px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/watch-for-black-cutworm-as-corn-starts-to-emerge/black-cutworm-larva-j-smith-1/" rel="attachment wp-att-13669"><img class="size-medium wp-image-13669" src="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/black-cutworm-larva-J-Smith-1-300x179.jpg" alt="Black cutworm larva. J Smith, UGRC." width="300" height="179" srcset="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/black-cutworm-larva-J-Smith-1-300x179.jpg 300w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/black-cutworm-larva-J-Smith-1-768x458.jpg 768w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/black-cutworm-larva-J-Smith-1-1024x610.jpg 1024w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/black-cutworm-larva-J-Smith-1.jpg 1596w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a><p class="wp-caption-text">Black cutworm larva. J Smith, UGRC.</p></div> <p>The storm fronts that pushed up from the southern states over the last month not only carried rain with them but also carried in black cutworm moths. Trap catches have been higher than normal this year in neighbouring states, indicating a higher risk this spring for Ontario.  Once they arrive, the adult moths look for weedy green patches in fields to lay their eggs on.  Fields at risk include those with pre-plant annual weeds (eg. chickweed, mustards, volunteer wheat, lamb’s-quarters, velvetleaf etc), cover crops or crop residue.  Delayed burn downs increase the risk of injury, as the larvae feed on the existing plants and weeds while waiting to move over to the corn crop once it emerges.  Fields near Lake Erie tend to have more frequent infestations from moths dropping down as soon as they cross the lake, but infestations are not exclusive to fields in that area.</p> <div id="attachment_13668" style="width: 210px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/watch-for-black-cutworm-as-corn-starts-to-emerge/image-4-cutworm-foliar-damage-baute/" rel="attachment wp-att-13668"><img class="size-medium wp-image-13668" src="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Image-4-cutworm-foliar-damage-Baute-200x300.jpg" alt="Leaf feeding damage by young black cutworm larvae. T Baute, OMAFRA" width="200" height="300" srcset="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Image-4-cutworm-foliar-damage-Baute-200x300.jpg 200w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Image-4-cutworm-foliar-damage-Baute-768x1152.jpg 768w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Image-4-cutworm-foliar-damage-Baute-683x1024.jpg 683w" sizes="(max-width: 200px) 100vw, 200px" /></a><p class="wp-caption-text">Leaf feeding damage by young black cutworm larvae. T Baute, OMAFRA</p></div> <p>Young larvae feed on the corn leaves, leaving small pinholes but eventually take bigger chunks from the leaf margins, given the plant the appearance of hail damage. Larger larvae also hollow out the stalk of the small plants or cut them off at or below the soil line, causing the plant to wilt or be left laying on the ground.  The longer the delay before crop emergence, the larger the larvae will be moving over to the crop. In this scenario, you are less likely to see the early feeding leaf feeding damage and instead find plants being cut off  at or below the soil line.  Once the crop is in the V5 stage, the growing point of the plant is above ground and can tolerate most of the injury and the larger larvae are slowing down in their feeding, only cutting a few more plants before pupating.</p> <div id="attachment_13667" style="width: 310px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/watch-for-black-cutworm-as-corn-starts-to-emerge/image-5-plant-cut-off-at-soil-level-by-black-cutworm-a-schaafsma-2/" rel="attachment wp-att-13667"><img class="size-medium wp-image-13667" src="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Image-5-Plant-cut-off-at-soil-level-by-black-cutworm-A-Schaafsma-300x289.jpg" alt="Corn plant cut off at soil level by black cutworm. A Schaafsma, UGRC" width="300" height="289" srcset="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Image-5-Plant-cut-off-at-soil-level-by-black-cutworm-A-Schaafsma-300x289.jpg 300w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Image-5-Plant-cut-off-at-soil-level-by-black-cutworm-A-Schaafsma.jpg 540w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></a><p class="wp-caption-text">Corn plant cut off at soil level by black cutworm. A Schaafsma, UGRC</p></div> <p>Seed treatments containing clothianidin (eg. Poncho), cyantraniliprole (i.e. Fortenza) and chlorantraniliprole (i.e. Lumivia) provide early protection. <a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Registered-Bt-events-April-2017-Final-English-Corrected.pdf" target="_blank">Bt hybrids containing Cry1F or Vip3A</a> also provide protection against black cutworm.  So focus first on scouting those fields not planted with one these control options. Foliar insecticide treatments can provide effective control, if applied at threshold and before larvae are larger than 2.5 cm.  Inspect 20 plants in five areas of the field once or twice per week from VE until the crop is into the V5 stage. Look for pinholes or notches on the leaves, or wilting or cut plants.  Dig the soil around the injured plant to find the larvae which hide in the soil during the day.</p> <p><strong>Foliar threshold:</strong> Control is warranted if 10% of plants in the V1 toV4 stage have damaged leaves/pinholes or 3% or more plants are cut and larvae are smaller than 2.5 cm.  Insecticides are not effective on larvae larger than 2.5 cm.</p> <p>Foliar insecticide options can be found <a href="http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/crops/pub812/pub812ch1.pdf" target="_blank">here </a> and within the <a href="http://gfo.ca/apps" target="_blank">Pest Manager app</a></p> <p>More information can also be found in the <a href="http://gfo.ca/Portals/0/Production/Production%20Resources/Field%20Guides/CropPests.pdf" target="_blank">Guide to Early Season Field Crop Pests</a>.</p> </div> http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/watch-for-black-cutworm-as-corn-starts-to-emerge/feed/ 0 2017-05-15 15:14 +00:00 2017-05-15 11:14 -04:00 http://fieldcropnews.com/?p=13642 http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/ontario-field-crop-report-may-11-2017/ Crop Reports Ontario Field Crop Report – May 11, 2017 &#160; Winter Wheat: The winter wheat crop continues to grow well. The cool temperatures have slowed growth a little. The frost on the mornings of May 8 and 9 appear to have had little impact on the crop other than some minor damage to leaf tips. Fortunately, the wheat was not in head. Some fields in the Niagara and Haldimand... Thu, 11 May 2017 18:35:19 Z http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/ontario-field-crop-report-may-11-2017/#respond OMAFRA Field Crop Team <div class="pf-content"><p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Winter Wheat:</strong></p> <div id="attachment_13647" style="width: 235px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Stripe-Rust-Revised.jpg"><img class="size-medium wp-image-13647" src="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Stripe-Rust-Revised-225x300.jpg" alt="Figure 1- Stripe rust levels in non-fungicide check areas went from &lt;1% incidence and severity (May 3, 2017) to 100% incidence and 30-60% severity (May 10, 2017) in a week." width="225" height="300" /></a><p class="wp-caption-text"><strong>Figure 1</strong>&#8211; Stripe rust levels in non-fungicide check areas went from &lt;1% incidence and severity (May 3, 2017) to 100% incidence and 30-60% severity (May 10, 2017) in a week.</p></div> <p>The winter wheat crop continues to grow well. The cool temperatures have slowed growth a little. The frost on the mornings of May 8 and 9 appear to have had little impact on the crop other than some minor damage to leaf tips. Fortunately, the wheat was not in head. Some fields in the Niagara and Haldimand regions still require a nitrogen application but will have to wait until the fields are fit. A number of fields with split applications of nitrogen still require the second application as well. Red clover under seeded in the wheat is doing well as there has been adequate moisture for germination and early growth. At this point in time there is marginal benefit to applying herbicides to the wheat crop. Winter annuals have already impacted the crop and most perennial weeds (sow thistle) are not fully emerged. Late planted fields that are thinner may still benefit from a herbicide application.</p> <p>Septoria leaf spot and powdery mildew continue to be the most common diseases present in the lower canopy. Wheat streak mosaic virus was confirmed in Huron County. With the rapid growth of the crop and favourable weather conditions, it is important to continue scouting to determine if fungal disease infection is progressing up the plant (especially on susceptible varieties) and is critical to determine if a fungicide application is needed and at what timing  (flag leaf/T2 or flowering/T3).</p> <p>Stripe rust was also found in one field in Oxford County as well as another in Stoney Point (Essex County). As mentioned last week, there are large differences in variety susceptibility to stripe rust and fields planted with susceptible varieties should be scouted and targeted first. Figure 1 shows how rapidly stripe rust can develop on a susceptible variety.  The image is from the non-fungicide check strip from the first confirmed stripe rust field in Stoney Point.  Trace amounts of stripe rust was detected when the field was sprayed on May 3, 2017.  In a week, the disease went from less than 1% to 100% incidence and 30-60% severity where a fungicide was not applied.  Fields planted to tolerant or resistant varieties need to be regularly assessed from now until heading to assess stripe rust risk.  Remember strobilurin based fungicides should not be applied on wheat from the boot stage and later.</p> <p><strong>Spring cereals:</strong></p> <p>Spring cereal acreage will likely be lower this year as it has been difficult to get the crop planted. If it is still desired to plant a spring cereal for feed a good option would be oats or adding peas to the oat crop to increase crude protein. Spring cereals that are planted have sprouted but not yet emerged.</p> <p><strong>Corn:</strong></p> <p>The number of corn acres in the ground has changed very little in the last week as significant rainfall occurred across the province May 4<sup>th</sup> to 6<sup>th</sup>. Much of the province received about 50mm (2 inches) with some areas receiving more and others less than that. In most areas the fields are draining well. Fields with less than adequate drainage or fields with poor crop rotations and lots of tillage are draining more slowly. A few days after the rain fertilizer spreaders, sprayers and some planters were getting back on the sandier soils. As planting is further delayed the temptation will be to plant in less than ideal conditions. Keep in mind what happened last year when corn was planted wet and the rain stopped. Roots couldn’t penetrate the side wall compaction and the slot opened up exposing the seed. The ideal corn planting depth is 1.5” to 2” (3.5 to 5 cm).</p> <p>Chickweed and other prostrate plants are attractive for egg laying by black cutworm moths arriving on winds blowing up from the US.  Trapping networks in the U.S. and Ontario are reporting a higher and earlier than normal black cutworm flight this spring. Preventative measures include delaying planting by two to three weeks after a burn down which causes the young cutworm larvae to starve, prior to the crop emerging. Prolonged wet weather like this year, reduces the chance for these preventative measures to be put in place. Take note of those fields planted shortly after burn down and plan to scout for leaf feeding and cutting injury every three to four days, once the crop emerges until it is safely past the V4 stage.</p> <p>Armyworm moths are being caught in traps earlier and more abundant this year.  Scouting cereals, mixed forages and emerging corn fields will need to take priority in the last two weeks of May.  Scouting alerts and management information will be provided in upcoming crop reports and on Field Crop News.</p> <p><strong>Canola:</strong></p> <p>A small percentage of the canola crop has been planted due to wet field conditions. Early planting of the crop is recommended to avoid Swede Midge infestations. Early planting may be a challenge this year. Ideally the crop should be planted by May 20<sup>th</sup>. Crop insurance planting deadlines range from May 31 to June 10 depending on location.</p> <p><strong>Forage and Pasture:</strong></p> <p>Hay and pasture growth has been good due to adequate moisture conditions. Excess moisture has made it difficult to get livestock on the pastures and some are pulling livestock off as it is no longer fit.</p> <p>Figure 1- Stripe rust levels in non-fungicide check areas went from &lt;1% incidence and severity (May 3, 2017) to 100% incidence and 30-60% severity (May 10, 2017) in a week.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/ontario-field-crop-report-may-11-2017/feed/ 0 2017-05-11 18:35 +00:00 2017-05-11 14:35 -04:00 http://fieldcropnews.com/?p=13639 http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/exeter-agribusiness-minutes-may-9-2017/ Ag Business Minutes Exeter Agribusiness Minutes – May 9, 2017 &#160; Thank you to Joanna Follings who chaired the meeting and to Syngenta for spronsoring breakfast.  There was an excellent turnout and discussion. The next meeting will be on May 23rd starting at 7:00 a.m. for breakfast (meeting starts at 7:30). Steve Johns will be the chairman. Synopsis: Widespread rainfall last week and over the weekend continues to prevent field work.... Wed, 10 May 2017 18:37:36 Z http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/exeter-agribusiness-minutes-may-9-2017/#respond OMAFRA Field Crop Team <div class="pf-content"><p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Thank you to Joanna Follings who chaired the meeting and to Syngenta for spronsoring breakfast.  There was an excellent turnout and discussion. The next meeting will be on May 23<sup>rd</sup> starting at 7:00 a.m. for breakfast (meeting starts at 7:30). Steve Johns will be the chairman.</p> <p><strong>Synopsis</strong>: Widespread rainfall last week and over the weekend continues to prevent field work. The sun came out Sunday and the forecast looks promising so there is hope that planting can start on lighter soils by the end of this week. Compaction is likely to become a problem this year with equipment entering fields before they are fit. Urea application is expected to start today and herbicide applications will begin as well. Rainfall was widespread over the weekend and ranged from 1.5” in Varna, 2” in Stratford, 5” in Mt Forest, 3 to 6” in Bruce county, and 4 to 8” in Eastern Ontario. There was a report that the Canadian Armed Forces purchased bags from seed processors for sandbags over the weekend to assist in flood relief efforts in Eastern Ontario and Quebec. Corn planted on April 20<sup>th</sup> has emerged but has not moved since then. Some wheat fields are starting to suffer from wet conditions in areas of the field. Red clover stands are excellent and are at the unifoliate to the first trifoliate leaf stage. Red clover becomes more susceptible to frost at the 1<sup>st</sup> trifoliate leaf stage so some stands may have been damaged from the frost last night. Cover crop management is likely to become an issue for those growers that have not sprayed off the crop yet. In wet springs the extra residue will also delay soil drying.  To terminate annual ryegrass use 1 L of WeatherMax plus 0.3 L Assure. Glyphosate by itself will not do an adequate job.</p> <p><strong>Corn</strong>: Growers should not consider switching adapted hybrids to shorter season corn hybrids at this date. Those growers that were extremely aggressive in choosing long season corn hybrids have already switched. Growers should consider switching hybrids on May 20<sup>th</sup> in areas with less than 2800 CHU’s, May 25<sup>th</sup> with 2800 to 3000 CHU’s, and May 30<sup>th</sup> in areas with more than 3000 CHU’s. How much N was lost due to the rain? Conditions have been cool so the loss should not be significant to date. Generally, it’s only about 1-2 % per day if the soils are saturated. See Simcoe Breakfast meeting minutes for a chart of potential losses.</p> <p><strong>Wheat</strong>: Tile run wheat is now becoming more evident, although most of the wheat still looks excellent. About ½ of the wheat in this area has received a fungicide / herbicide application. Almost all the wheat got at least one application of N. About 1/3 of the wheat in the Niagara region has not received any N. Some growers are considering a helicopter application. Is it acceptable to stream 28% when temperatures are cold? What about herbicide or fungicide applications? It was agreed that 28% could be streamed safely 24 hours after a frost. A herbicide application is generally safe 48 hours after a frost. Keep in mind that the leaf cuticle is thin this year due to many consecutive overcast days. This will make the crop more susceptible to damage. If the leaves are damaged fungicide efficacy will be compromised because the fungicide cannot get into the leaf. Typically it’s the surfactants that do the most damage so the more that is mixed in a tank the more damage that will occur. If temperatures fall below 0 degrees C there is a potential for damage even if only a fungicide is sprayed by itself. Increasing water volumes will decrease leaf burn (20 gallons/acre).  Unless the crop is very thin or weeds are extremely thick the value of a herbicide on wheat is questionable now, especially at flag leaf. Winter annuals are too large to be killed. Sow-thistle has not emerged and wheat will out-compete weeds like ragweed. Fields that received a herbicide last fall are much cleaner. Stripe rust has been found in the southwest (Essex). Spores of this disease blew in from the United States. Fortunately, the disease has not spread that quickly to date. Those growers that have susceptible varieties should spray a fungicide.  Variety susceptibility is posted on gocereals.ca.  If a variety has a rating of 6 or higher the variety is susceptible to stripe rust and will benefit from a fungicide application.  If a variety is rated 3 to 5 than it is moderately resistant and should be scouted for stripe rust regularly.  If stripe rust appears to be challenging the upper leaves of the canopy in these moderately resistant varieties than you may want to consider a fungicide application, particularly if the wheat is just at flag leaf.  If stripe rust incidence and severity is low on these tolerant varieties and you are approaching fusarium fungicide application timing (&lt;week) then you are likely able to wait until the fusarium timing fungicide.  If a variety in your area has a rating less than 2 than this indicates that the variety is resistant against stripe rust and will likely not benefit from an early season fungicide application.  A lot depends on the level of infection in the field and area &#8211; remember environmental conditions, crop susceptibility and pathogen presence are all necessary for disease development (Disease Triangle).Leaf rust is also present this year and has been found in Bruce County. It overwinters here unlike stripe rust. From the number of reports of leaf rust it does not seem to have overwintered well. Powdery mildew is heavy in some varieties near Clinton. Some fields are yellow especially where excess rainfall fell. Fields with high levels of N still look pale. Leaf tissue samples coming into the lab for sulphur are at 0.2%. Most agreed that values should be over 0.25 in wheat; however, high N can induce  S deficiency.</p> <p><strong>Soybeans</strong>: There continues to be concern over seed supplies and quality especially in short season areas. There is seed available but it may not be the exact variety requested. There seem to be more “abnormals” this year which can make the germ test appear worse than it is. Field experience has shown that at least ½ of “abnormals” will still produce normal plants. Seed grown in the Lindsay area has especially high clean out this year. Growers should be encouraged to use a fungicide seed treatment. Seed treatments do not increase germination but they can increase emergence and early season vigour. Seeding rate recommendations are based on 90% germination and 90% emergence (81% plant stands). Therefore seeding rates should not be increased if soil conditions are good just because the germination is slightly lower. Growers using bin run seed are encouraged to do a germination test. A list of labs can be found at: <a href="http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/crops/pub811/15appendixf.htm">www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/crops/pub811/15appendixf.htm</a></p> <p><strong>Agricorp:</strong><strong> </strong>There is increased interest in the forage insufficient rainfall plan due to last year’s dry conditions. There is also considerable interest in the standard new forage plan which is designed to insure cover crops. There have been few damage reports to date mostly from Lambton County. Please remind growers to call in damage reports.</p> <p><strong>May 1</strong>: New applications and coverage changes</p> <p><strong>June 15</strong>: Last day to report unseeded acreage.</p> <p><strong>June 30</strong>: Spring seeded final acreage reports due.</p> <p><strong>July 10</strong>: Premiums</p> <p>Report Damage as soon as it occurs<strong>.</strong></p> <p>Previous meeting minutes are posted on:  <strong>Field Crop News Website</strong> – <a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/">http://fieldcropnews.com/</a></p> <p><u>Upcoming Events</u>:</p> <p>Southwest Crop Diagnostic Days &#8211; July 5 and 6, 2017</p> <p>FarmSmart Expo &#8211; July 13</p> <p>Eastern Crops Day &#8211; July 19</p> <p><u>Stratford Crop Technology Contacts</u>:</p> <p>Horst Bohner, <a href="mailto:horst.bohner@ontario.ca">horst.bohner@ontario.ca</a></p> <p>Joanna Follings, <a href="mailto:joanna.follings@ontario.ca">joanna.follings@ontario.ca</a></p> <p>Meghan Moran, <a href="mailto:meghan.moran@ontario.ca">meghan.moran@ontario.ca</a></p> <p>Jake Munroe, <a href="mailto:jake.munroe@ontario.ca">jake.munroe@ontario.ca</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/exeter-agribusiness-minutes-may-9-2017/feed/ 0 2017-05-10 18:37 +00:00 2017-05-10 14:37 -04:00 http://fieldcropnews.com/?p=13634 http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/winchester-ag-breakfast-meeting-notes-may-9-2017/ Ag Business Minutes Winchester Ag Breakfast Meeting Notes – May 9, 2017 Correction to Markets section: From Many analysts are expecting soybean prices to continue increasing. Should read: Many market analysts are expecting soybean acres to continue increasing. &#160; General Conditions: Wet fields continue to delay field operations. Many farms in the area drain into the Ottawa River, where levels still need to go down before those can dry out. We have... Wed, 10 May 2017 15:14:54 Z http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/winchester-ag-breakfast-meeting-notes-may-9-2017/#respond OMAFRA Field Crop Team <div class="pf-content"><p><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>Correction to Markets section: From </strong><span style="text-decoration: line-through">Many</span> <span style="text-decoration: line-through">analysts are expecting soybean prices to continue increasing.</span> Should read: <strong>Many </strong><strong>market analysts are expecting soybean acres to continue increasing.</strong></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>General Conditions:</strong></p> <p>Wet fields continue to delay field operations. Many farms in the area drain into the Ottawa River, where levels still need to go down before those can dry out. We have seen about 160% more rain in the last thirty days compared to the historical 30-day average; 60-day rainfall is 240% above average. In Ottawa, 125 mm fell in the first week of May, whereas the 25-year average is 25 mm. Elsewhere in Eastern Ontario rainfall ranged from 90-140 mm. This situation somewhat mirrors the 2011 season up to this point &#8211; when many fields weren’t planted until the end of May &#8211; but we’re already 66 mm over that season counting from April 1<sup>st</sup> (historical data from Kemptville station). Thankfully there’s less rain forecasted for this week, but most people won’t be on fields until next week at the earliest.</p> <p>Very little manure has gone out, and pits are filling up. About 10-15% of fertilizer has been applied, much of it as UAN. No herbicides have been applied yet.</p> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>Forages</strong></p> <p>Generally, stored forage inventories are lower than in past years. Wet weather has delayed cattle being moved out to pasture, and in some cases they have been pulled off before the big rains. Some graziers will be sending cattle out soon regardless as they are concerned about stands getting ahead of them. In some cases cattle are being taken off pastures due to concern of trampling damage in the saturated soils.</p> <p>Forage stand survival has generally been good with the exception of pockets in older stands and some thinning in new stands. Much of the damage has been in the Osgoode area. Most of the damaged stands will be replaced with no-till corn. More new forage seeding acreage is going in than was originally planned. A few people are starting to ask how long alfalfa seed survives under water – if it hasn’t yet germinated, it should be fine.</p> <p>Growers planning to use <strong>Priaxor ® fungicide</strong> on alfalfa should apply it now. Alfalfa is at the 15 to 20 cm (6 – 8 inch) height and is the perfect time to apply <strong>Priaxor ® fungicide. There is a </strong>2 week pre-harvest interval and 3 weeks after application is ideal harvest time, Maximum 2 applications per season. Registered for common leaf spot disease control and white mold suppression for better leaf retention resulting in better alfalfa quality for feed. Cost is same as corn or soybeans, at approximately $17/acre. The area more plots in the area again this year and a few growers trying it. Will be a good fit for low-lignin alfalfa where planning to leave it for a longer period before harvesting.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Spring cereals</strong></p> <p>Close to half has been planted (depending in part on soil texture and tillage system) and about half has been fertilized. No-tilled fields are mostly planted, but fields that will be tilled are still waiting. Overall, about two to four more good planting days are needed to finish. Spring wheat yields can still be very good if planted before May 25<sup>th</sup>.</p> <p>There have been some reports of damage from standing water, and growers are reminded that the crop insurance deadline for spring cereals is May 15<sup>th</sup> (see below for full schedule).</p> <p>A question was raised if growers are looking for straw production if it’s time to switch to barley over spring wheat. Spring wheat will tolerate a tougher seed bed than barley. Increasing the spring wheat seeding rates to 2 million seeds per acre can overcome the decreased tillering. Delayed planting will increase the need for the use of a fungicide. Oats would be preferred over barley as they tolerate wetter conditions than barley.</p> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>Winter wheat</strong></p> <p>Survival is acceptable overall. About 5-10% will be taken out, to be replaced mostly with barley or spring wheat and some corn as well. Second pass of nitrogen needs to be applied on red wheat. At this point, there is little benefit to weed control in winter wheat other than in thin stands.</p> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>Corn</strong></p> <p>About 5000 acres have been planted in the region. First corn went in on April 19<sup>th</sup> in Napanee and early plantings have germinated. Some fields were planted late last week on high sandy soils. Soil temperatures were good at 12 degrees (ideal is 10 degrees), so plant whenever soil moisture conditions permit.</p> <p>Much discussion was had about switching hybrids due to delayed planting conditions. Contrary to the soybeans situation, there is plenty of supply for corn seed. “Stretch” (longer than adapted) hybrids are largely being replaced with shorter-season varieties. In Dundas County, stretch hybrids require over 3000 CHU, though in Renfrew 2800 CHU hybrids are considered stretch. Recent years have seen 3000-3100 CHU seasons.</p> <p>“Adapted” hybrids shouldn’t be a concern until about May 25<sup>th</sup>. Yield loss due to delayed planting is generally minimal until the third week of May, depending on variety. The hybrid selection is flexible based on silage and high moisture corn needs. Soil type, fertility flowering date and bushel weight need to be considered. Talk to your seed dealer to discuss the suitability of specific hybrids. In most cases, they have pulled back hybrids of concern and are satisfied with the system for exchanging seed across southern Ontario to adapt with seasonal conditions.</p> <p>It was recommended to reduce high plant per acre population of 36,000 plus to 34,000 to reduce plant stress, but can also be hybrid dependent. It was also noted that leaving corn to dry in the field over winter has helped improve grade in a past difficult year.</p> <p>Not too much nitrogen is likely to be lost from applied fertilizer as low temperatures mean slower conversion to NO<sub>3</sub> which can be lost. Ammonia loss from soil is somewhat less of a concern in Eastern Ontario with cool weather. Uncertainty remains about the impact of current weather on the soil nitrogen availability.</p> <p>Some concern that the poorly drained soils, with current high water levels and the projected rain in the forecast could mean that growers may switch to soybeans due to extended delayed planting. The soybean seed supply could limit this option.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Soybean</strong></p> <p>Seed supply is tight, with what was called a “perfect storm” for the industry: quality of seed that tested well in fall fell over winter, and some Xtend varieties were not registered. Identity Preserved (IP) soybean acres are down, although with limited seed availability IP acres may increase.</p> <p>Some discussion about the effectiveness of soybean seed treatment. Late planting might show benefit in cold and wet conditions. Greater benefit to soybean seed treatments in area with high bean leaf beetle pressure. Local trials haven’t shown as much response where there is no bean leaf beetle pressure. Lower cost and the risk of crop failure means fungicide-treated seed is still worth the cost as insurance.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Federal seed act</strong></p> <p>The Federal Seed Act, Weed Seed Order went into effect December, 2016. This is the national defence to stop weed movement. Most regulations are dealt with by seed companies, not growers.</p> <p>Half of the species on the list are new species – those added include many not known to be in Canada. Palmer amaranth is causing a lot of discussion, but is not on the list as it is very difficult to distinguish seeds from other amaranth seeds.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Markets</strong></p> <p>Much of the US was also experiencing wet weather, so markets were up last week. They have since stabilized as the forecast has cleared. Moving forward, the market will be reacting to weather and actual numbers of planted acres. Many market analysts are expecting soybean acres to continue increasing. The weak Canadian dollar maintains basis in our favour.</p> <p>See chart for the most recent USDA statistics on corn planting: http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/usda/current/CropProg/CropProg-05-08-2017.pdf</p> <p><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/US-Crop-Progress-as-of-9-May2017.png"><img class="alignleft wp-image-13635" src="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/US-Crop-Progress-as-of-9-May2017-300x147.png" alt="US Crop Progress as of 9 May2017" width="598" height="293" srcset="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/US-Crop-Progress-as-of-9-May2017-300x147.png 300w, http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/US-Crop-Progress-as-of-9-May2017.png 728w" sizes="(max-width: 598px) 100vw, 598px" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>OMAFRA Soil Specialist, Kemptville &#8211; Sebastian Belliard</strong></p> <p>The arrival of a soil management specialist will help bring more Ontario soil research to our region. The Renfrew County Soil &amp; Crop Improvement Association is again running their Ontario Soil Health Assessment project in 2017. Soil mapping in Ottawa-Carleton will continue this year. The area to be mapped has been expanded to cover the entire Ottawa-Carleton region beyond the city, as well as the Greenbelt.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Pesticide and fertilizer update</strong></p> <p>DuPont &#8211; Barricade M good on perennials for burndown in wheat, more kick than Refine. Engarde has new all dry packaging this year.</p> <p>Bayer – <strong>ILeVO<sup>®</sup></strong> seed treatment is registered for protection against Soybean Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS) and soybean cyst nematode. Bayer and Monsanto deal – Bayer will have to sell <strong><em>LibertyLink</em></strong><sup>®</sup> technology to allow deal to go through.</p> <p>Monsanto &#8211; US approved technology to combat nematodes</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Crop Insurance Update: </strong></p> <p><strong>2017 Planting deadlines, see:</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.agricorp.com/SiteCollectionDocuments/PID-PlantingDates-SpringGandO-en.pdf">http://www.agricorp.com/SiteCollectionDocuments/PID-PlantingDates-SpringGandO-en.pdf</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Page Content</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td><strong>Deadline</strong></td> <td><strong>Description</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td>June 15, 2017</td> <td> <ul> <li>Report damage for USAB</li> </ul> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>June 30, 2017</td> <td> <ul> <li>Report acreage</li> </ul> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>July 10, 2017</td> <td> <ul> <li>Pay premium</li> </ul> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>December 15, 2017</td> <td> <ul> <li>Report yield</li> </ul> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>Upcoming Field Days:</strong> Southwest Crop Diagnostic Days &#8211; July 5-6 (Ridgetown College) &#8211; diagnosticdays.ca FarmSmart Expo &#8211; July 13 (Elora Research Station) &#8211; farmsmartconference.com Eastern Crops Day &#8211; July 20 (Winchester Research Station) &#8211; eocdd.eastontcropconference.ca</p> <p><em>Thank you to Stephanie Nanne, P.T. Sullivan Agro for taking notes for this morning’s meeting. </em></p> </div> http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/winchester-ag-breakfast-meeting-notes-may-9-2017/feed/ 0 2017-05-10 15:14 +00:00 2017-05-10 11:14 -04:00 http://fieldcropnews.com/?p=13532 http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/time-to-join-the-2017-western-bean-cutworm-trap-network/ Baute Bug Blog Corn Edible Beans Uncategorized WBC Infosheets WBC Trapping Instructions Western Bean Cutworm Trap Network Time to Join the 2017 Western Bean Cutworm Trap Network Calling all WBC Trap Participants!  The WBC Trap Network website is now up and running and ready for you to add your trap sites and join our trapping network. Anyone wishing to join must login and create a new user account at www.cornpest.ca. Click on the “Login” menu from the top left of the page (on a computer) or from... Tue, 09 May 2017 13:49:05 Z http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/time-to-join-the-2017-western-bean-cutworm-trap-network/#respond Tracey Baute <div class="pf-content"><p>Calling all WBC Trap Participants!  The WBC Trap Network website is now up and running and ready for you to add your trap sites and join our trapping network.</p> <p>Anyone wishing to join must login and create a new user account at <a href="http://www.cornpest.ca" target="_blank">www.cornpest.ca</a>. Click on the “Login” menu from the top left of the page (on a computer) or from the top right of the page (using a mobile device). This will take you to the site&#8217;s login page. Scroll to the bottom of the login page and there you will find a link to “Create a new Account” page.  <strong>Note</strong> that all usernames, by default, will begin with &#8220;CP-&#8221; followed by your email address (eg. CP-johnsmith@hotmail.com).  More detailed instructions on how to login and create an account has been provided here.</p> <p>For each corn field, you will need one trap. For each dry bean field, you will need two traps.  We prefer bucket traps (aka uni-traps) instead of the milk jug traps which are more labour intensive and must have antifreeze in them at all times work.  Detailed trapping instructions and trap supply lists and sources are also provided on the website at: <a href="http://www.cornpest.ca/wbc-trap-network/wbc-trapping-instructions/" target="_blank">http://www.cornpest.ca/wbc-trap-network/wbc-trapping-instructions/</a></p> <p>Enter your trap data no later than Wednesday of each week, entering the previous weeks counts and in return, we will have interactive maps published for all data coming in from Ontario, Quebec and new this year Michigan!  Traps need to go up sometime in June and stay up until the end of August.</p> <p>And finally, we have revised the WBC infosheets for both corn and dry beans.  Here are the links to those resources:</p> <p><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/WBC-Scouting-and-Management-2017-Corn-Final.pdf" target="_blank">2017 WBC Infosheet for Corn</a></p> <p><a href="http://fieldcropnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/WBC-2017-Dry-Bean-Infosheet.pdf" target="_blank">2017 WBC Infosheet for Dry Beans</a></p> <p>Happy Trapping!</p> </div> http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/time-to-join-the-2017-western-bean-cutworm-trap-network/feed/ 0 2017-05-09 13:49 +00:00 2017-05-09 09:49 -04:00 http://fieldcropnews.com/?p=13610 http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/ridgetown-agribusiness-breakfast-meeting-may-2-2017/ Ag Business Minutes Ridgetown Agribusiness Breakfast Meeting – May 2, 2017 Breakfast Sponsor: Thanks from the group to “Richard Anderson – BASF Canada”  Quote of the week &#8211; “Yellow as a Duck’s Foot” from Peter Johnson in reference to wheat with no N. Synopsis: The cool wet weather has slowed the development of the winter wheat crop. Some corn was planted last week mainly on the lighter soils. In the area... Mon, 08 May 2017 18:16:22 Z http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/ridgetown-agribusiness-breakfast-meeting-may-2-2017/#respond OMAFRA Field Crop Team <div class="pf-content"><p><strong>Breakfast Sponsor: Thanks from the group to “Richard Anderson – BASF Canada” </strong></p> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Quote of the week</strong> &#8211; <strong>“Yellow as a Duck’s Foot”</strong> from Peter Johnson in reference to wheat with no N.</p> <p><strong>Synopsis: </strong>The cool wet weather has slowed the development of the winter wheat crop. Some corn was planted last week mainly on the lighter soils. In the area less than 10% of the crop is planted. The odd field of soybeans was planted as well. The window for planting spring cereals in southern Ontario has now passed. Rainfall the last couple of days ranged from 1.2” near Rodney, to 1.5” south of Ridgetown and near Bothwell. Once the rains stop and the weather turns, custom applicators will have a hard time keeping up since burndowns, pre plant herbicides on corn, and second N applications on wheat will all need to be done at once.</p> <p><strong>Winter Wheat: </strong>Winter wheat that was planted early looks very good. The wheat that was planted close to Thanksgiving weekend is not as robust. The cool, wet weather has slowed the rate of wheat development. Wheat which is at the flag leaf stage in Essex County is a week ahead of normal. Cool wet soils have impacted some wheat fields. . All of the wheat has had at least one application of nitrogen. Fields needing a second application will get it as soon as the field is fit. Fields where the nitrogen application did not take place until growth stage 32 (2<sup>nd</sup> node) have poor growth and colour. Fields with a low first application of N are looking N deficient. It is possible that these fields could be sulphur deficient as well since cool soils are slow to release S. It was speculated that a larger per cent of the wheat had a split nitrogen application this year, a little over 50% in the area. For split N applications, many have applied 70-90 lbs/ac on early followed by 50 lbs/ac later. The less N put on later, the lower the risk of leaf burn. When considering the timing of nitrogen on winter wheat, you need to be in tune to response potential (N uptake) vs loss potential i.e. more than 50 lbs N/ac in March increases the risk for loss. Consider applying the second nitrogen application during early stem elongation, when there is some separation between the first and second node (growth stage 32). Avoid nitrogen applications after flag leaf emergence to reduce burning of the flag leaf.</p> <p>Sulphur is different than N in that as soon as there is a S deficiency then you start to see yield loss. The longer the period that wheat is S deficient the greater the yield loss. Manganese deficiency is apparent in fields with historic deficiencies. Annual weeds are emerging, but it may be a challenge to get the fields sprayed. Herbicide applications are normally made at the end of April or the first of May. More red clover was planted this year and it is coming along well due to good moisture conditions.</p> <p><u>Comments from Albert Tenuta:</u> The anticipated wet weather favours disease growth; although current disease levels remain low in most fields this can change quickly. Septoria leaf spot and powdery mildew are the most common diseases and primarily situated in the lower canopy. Last week, leaf rust was found in Bruce County; wheat spindle streak mosaic virus was confirmed in Essex County with the help of Settington’s (Essex). With the rapid growth of the crop and favourable weather conditions , it is important to continue scouting to determine if fungal disease infection is progressing up the plant (especially on susceptible varieties) and is critical to determine if a fungicide application is needed and at what timing (flag leaf/T2 or flowering/T3).</p> <p>Stripe rust was not reported at the time of the breakfast meeting. Since May 2, stripe rust was confirmed by Agris in Stoney Point (Essex). The timing of stripe rust in Ontario this year (May 3) is very similar to last year (May 5- Elgin County by Dave Hooker). In both years, lesions were found mid canopy and not on the lower leaves. This would suggest aerial distribution and not overwintering. The sequence of detection progressed from the southern US up the Ohio valley into Ontario would also support air dispersal. If overwintering is occurring in the upper Midwest (Ohio valley) and Ontario, stripe rust detection dates would be expected to be very similar across the region and not sequential.</p> <p>This year’s situation in Indiana and Kentucky is more typical of the normal development (slower) compared to last year which was rapid (explosive). Colleagues in Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois report that stripe rust infection for the most part has not progressed as quickly as last year. A few factors may be contributing to this including more tolerant varieties being planted, less spore deposition into the region, earlier fungicide applications (herbicide/T1), etc. This could be beneficial for Ontario since lower spore production theoretically means less potential spores migrating into the Ontario and therefore less initial infection points. Many fields in Essex are at full flag emergence which is ahead of normal by up to a week. I would suspect stripe rust to develop under these conditions but with less potential inoculum spore load, the rate of development could be slower (or more typical of stripe rust for Ontario conditions).</p> <p>Talking about this lousy weather! Dave Hooker compared 2017 with 2016 and over the past two weeks we have been warmer both during the day and night-time compared to 2016 (Table 1 – bottom). Therefore, weather conditions have been the same if not more favourable to date for stripe rust. In 2016, the three weeks from May 5 to May 25 warmed up with frequent rain events which as we saw were ideal for stripe rust development. The forecast temperatures for the next three weeks are for cooler daytime temperatures (especially May 5-11) while night temperatures will higher. Remember last year, spore deposition into the area was probably much higher than what is expected this year. Environmental conditions, crop susceptibility and pathogen presence are all necessary for disease development (Disease Triangle).</p> <p>As was observed last year, there are large differences in variety susceptibility to the disease. Growers should check with their seed supplier and the Ontario OCCC performance trials for specific variety ratings (www.gocereals.ca). Encourage all wheat growers to get out scouting for stripe rust. Based on last years’ experience, a timely fungicide applied to susceptible varieties was beneficial and a good integrated wheat disease management strategy. Fields planted with susceptible varieties should be targeted first. If stripe rust is found in more fields and begins to increase after this week’s rains, it may be necessary to spray susceptible varieties. If the rate of disease development and spread is slow in susceptible varieties, a delay of fungicide application may be possible but it will depend on the weather and if a previous fungicide was applied (T1). Fields planted to tolerant or resistant varieties need to regularly assess fields from now until heading to assess stripe rust risk.</p> <p>Early fungicide applications with herbicides (T1.5 to T1.8 timing or before flag leaf emergence) have been applied to about 30% of the wheat. Fungicides perform better when the crop is not N or S deficient. If the first fungicide application to wheat is at GS 32 it will be protected to T3 timing. The full rate of fungicide should provide 2 weeks minimum of protection. The chances of a problem before T3 are very low unless stripe rust is a factor in your area (see above). Apply the fungicide based on growth stage. Cool weather slows wheat growth. Remember strobilurin based fungicides should not be applied on wheat from the boot stage and later.</p> <p>Seed wheat fields look good and half have had a fungicide application. The window for planting spring cereals in southern Ontario has now passed. A significant proportion of the Kansas wheat crop was devastated over the weekend due to snow, flooding and severe storms. It caused a bump in prices.</p> <p><strong>Corn: </strong>The area from London west is about 5 to 10% planted, likely on the lower end of the range. Chatham-Kent is about 20 to 25% planted mainly in an area from Chatham to Dresden to Ridgetown to West Lorne, with many growers planting up to the rain. Some corn planted April 18<sup>th</sup> is just poking through the soil. A few corn plots were planted. The crop that was planted before the rain was planted into good soil conditions. The rain this past weekend (April 30-May 1) is not ideal but the corn will likely be fine. Following the expected heavy rains of May 4-7, corn fields should be assessed. Some corn was planted in the Blenheim area on the clays no-till and tilled. Some U.S. agronomists are promoting planting corn 2.5” deep. A small group discussed this after the meeting and felt that 1.5” to 2” is where corn should be planted. In Essex County most of the growers are being patient and waiting until it is fit. Some have had questions about switching to earlier maturing hybrids. It is too early to have that conversation yet. It will be at least 2 weeks before seed corn is planted. Corn planted on lighter sand soils followed by cold wet weather will not be a big concern from cold inhibition. There could be a possible interaction with some herbicides.</p> <p><strong>Soybeans:</strong> Soybeans planted 3 weeks ago are knuckling but have not emerged. A few fields of soybeans have been planted. For anybody who is not buying certified seed the seed size and quality is an issue. Be sure to check the germination. With soil temperatures at 10C the companies are not in a rush to plant seed soybeans.</p> <p><strong>Weed Control:</strong> The most common question Peter Sikkema has been asked recently is about glyphosate resistant Canada fleabane control. He recommends a pre plant application in corn of glyphosate plus Integrity, Callisto + atrazine, Marksman or Banvel. In soybeans Eragon with the addition of metribuzin gives the best control. Use Infinity in wheat.</p> <p>Applying a burndown with 28% N will probably reduce the efficacy so make two trips or increase the rate of glyphosate. 28% will burn the leaf and reduce the herbicide uptake so need to use maximum rate.</p> <p><strong>Grad Students Attending (Thank you for the briedf summaries):</strong></p> <p><strong>Brittany Hedges</strong> from Harrow, Ontario is a 2nd year MSc student with Peter Sikkema studying the control of Canada fleabane and waterhemp in Roundup Ready 2 Xtend Soybeans. Her research showed that as Canada fleabane increases in height control decreases. Conversely control of waterhemp was better with later application, likely because waterhemp continues to germinate so more plants would have been sprayed.</p> <p><strong>Lauren Benoit</strong> is a new Peter Sikkema graduate student looking at control of glyphoste-resistant waterhemp in corn. We&#8217;re going to be looking at both pre- and post- options as well as Group 27s tank-mixed with atrazine. In the fall, Lauren will be doing some survey work to record it&#8217;s distribution across SW Ontario.</p> <p><strong>Andrea Smith</strong> is starting her first season of field research for her MSc. with Dr. Peter Sikkema. Her project is focused on weed management in isoxaflutole resistant soybean. This work will help to develop best management practices for Balance GT soybean in Ontario.</p> <p><strong>Matthew Stewart</strong> is new grad student working with Dave Hooker (see cover crop section below).</p> <p><strong>Crop Insurance Report:</strong>  Almost 6900 acres of winter wheat have been reported damaged to date. The bulk of damaged acres is in Essex on clays, due to it being wet in fall and there is some in Lambton. The majority of the damage was reported due to excess rain (69%) and winter kill (25%). The reseeding benefit for corn is $117, soybeans $80, wheat $100, and organic wheat is $120.</p> <p><strong>Horticultural Crops: </strong>75% of sugarbeets are planted compared to 45% in US for Michigan Sugar. The companies are holding off tomatoes until the 9<sup>th</sup> or 10<sup>th</sup> of May weather permitting. They were originally targeting May 6<sup>th</sup>. Chlorthalinol will likely tight this year, last year mancozeb was in short supply but don’t know this year. Some growers have put on pre plant incorporated herbicide as it was picked up on the spray record app. Sugarbeets planted 2 weeks ago have emerged. They were up in a week, stands look good. Wet weather is not a problem as long as it doesn’t dry out and form a crust. Sweet corn planted under plastic is just poking through.</p> <p><strong>Dry Beans:</strong> Chris Gillard is researching different market classes to provide information to growers to make decisions on different classes, azuki to food grade soybeans, navy, and black for comparisons. The price of dry beans is up some to compete with $13 soybeans.</p> <p><strong>Cover Crops: </strong></p> <p>Matt Stewart is a new grad student working with Dave Hooker and Bill Deen. He is working on a new project studying long term effects of cover crops 2 crop rotations (corn-soybean-wheat and corn-soybean) and planted in 2 tillage systems at Ridgetown and Elora. There are 6 different cover crop treatments in the corn-soy-wheat rotation, and also 2 treatments in the corn-soy rotation.  The sites will aim to last for over 20 years.</p> <p>There should not be a concern with buckwheat going to seed in a cover crop mixture. Rye is not difficult to control. Annual ryegrass should be controlled early in the spring before it starts to elongate.</p> <p><strong>Industry News:</strong> It is hoped that Enlist corn will receive full European approval later this year and soybeans after that. Monsanto has backed out of selling Precision Planting to John Deere.</p> <p><strong>Publications</strong>: There is a new Soil Health in Ontario publication which gives a good overview of soil health. There are a number of soil health factsheets that will be available soon. A new Problem Weed Control Guide is available from your local OMAFRA office. There are also a number of new disease publications and resource materials available. Contact Albert Tenuta to obtain copies.</p> <p><strong>Next Meeting:</strong> Ridgetown Agribusiness meetings are held in the Willson Hall Campus Centre (downstairs) at the University of Guelph Ridgetown Campus. Meetings start at 7:15 am with breakfast and every two weeks on Tuesdays.  Next meeting is May 16, 2017.</p> <p><strong>Upcoming Events</strong></p> <p>Southwest Crop Diagnostic Days (University of Guelph, Ridgetown Campus) July 5 or 6, 2017<br /> FarmSmart Expo 2017 (University of Guelph, Elora Research Station) &#8211; July 13, 2017<br /> Eastern Crops Day (U. of G., Winchester Research Farm) – July 19, 2017<br /> Southwest Agricultural Conference – January 3 &amp; 4, 2018<br /> Summit on Canadian Soil Health 2017 – August 22 &amp; 23, Guelph</p> <p><strong>Table 1</strong> – Comparison of Temperature and Rainfall in Ridgetown, Ontario for 2016 and 2017 (2017 Forecast in grey) (Source: Dr. Dave Hooker)</p> <table style="width: 661px"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width: 90px"></td> <td style="width: 230px;text-align: center" colspan="3"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>2016</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 61px;text-align: center"><strong> </strong></td> <td style="width: 228px;text-align: center" colspan="3"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>2017</strong></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px"></td> <td style="width: 84px"><strong>Tmax (°C)</strong></td> <td style="width: 87.41px"><strong>Tmin (°C)</strong></td> <td style="width: 58.58px"><strong>Rain (mm)</strong></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px"><strong>Tmax (°C)</strong></td> <td style="width: 85px"><strong>Tmin (°C)</strong></td> <td style="width: 59px"><strong>Rain (mm)</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">14-Apr</td> <td style="width: 84px">10.9</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">-2.0</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">14.9</td> <td style="width: 85px">3.1</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">15-Apr</td> <td style="width: 84px">18.4</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">-0.3</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">25</td> <td style="width: 85px">7.6</td> <td style="width: 59px">1.4</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">16-Apr</td> <td style="width: 84px">20.7</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">5.5</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">23.6</td> <td style="width: 85px">13.7</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">17-Apr</td> <td style="width: 84px">21.5</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">1.8</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">17.8</td> <td style="width: 85px">2.3</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">18-Apr</td> <td style="width: 84px">25.0</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">2.9</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">12.6</td> <td style="width: 85px">1.8</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">19-Apr</td> <td style="width: 84px">16.5</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">2.8</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">23.6</td> <td style="width: 85px">7.6</td> <td style="width: 59px">4.4</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">20-Apr</td> <td style="width: 84px">16.7</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">1.2</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">10.4</td> <td style="width: 85px">6.8</td> <td style="width: 59px">8.2</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>7-day Ave</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 84px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>18.5</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 87.41px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>1.7</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 58.58px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong> </strong></span></td> <td style="width: 61px"><span style="color: #ff0000"> </span></td> <td style="width: 84px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>18.3</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 85px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>6.1</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 59px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong> </strong></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">21-Apr</td> <td style="width: 84px">14.8</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">9.2</td> <td style="width: 58.58px">2.6</td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">12</td> <td style="width: 85px">5.9</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">22-Apr</td> <td style="width: 84px">16.9</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">3.8</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">13.4</td> <td style="width: 85px">0.7</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">23-Apr</td> <td style="width: 84px">14.2</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">1.1</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">18</td> <td style="width: 85px">-2.7</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">24-Apr</td> <td style="width: 84px">16.2</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">-2.0</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">20.3</td> <td style="width: 85px">0.2</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">25-Apr</td> <td style="width: 84px">13.7</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">6.5</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">16</td> <td style="width: 85px">8.7</td> <td style="width: 59px">0.4</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">26-Apr</td> <td style="width: 84px">7.7</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">5.5</td> <td style="width: 58.58px">12.6</td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">18.4</td> <td style="width: 85px">9</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">27-Apr</td> <td style="width: 84px">11.6</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">-0.6</td> <td style="width: 58.58px">0.2</td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">23.9</td> <td style="width: 85px">10.9</td> <td style="width: 59px">0.8</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>7-day Ave</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 84px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>13.6</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 87.41px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>3.4</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 58.58px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong> </strong></span></td> <td style="width: 61px"><span style="color: #ff0000"> </span></td> <td style="width: 84px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>17.4</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 85px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>4.7</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 59px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong> </strong></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">28-Apr</td> <td style="width: 84px">10.0</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">3.9</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">14.8</td> <td style="width: 85px">5.6</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">29-Apr</td> <td style="width: 84px">10.4</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">3.4</td> <td style="width: 58.58px">6.6</td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">12.8</td> <td style="width: 85px">5.8</td> <td style="width: 59px">0.4</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">30-Apr</td> <td style="width: 84px">11.4</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">0.3</td> <td style="width: 58.58px">2.8</td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">11.4</td> <td style="width: 85px">5.7</td> <td style="width: 59px">15.2</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">01-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">12.5</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">7.7</td> <td style="width: 58.58px">5.4</td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">18</td> <td style="width: 85px">8</td> <td style="width: 59px">9.8</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">02-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">11.0</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">5.0</td> <td style="width: 58.58px">8.6</td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">10.2</td> <td style="width: 85px">6.4</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">03-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">15.2</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">2.1</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">15</td> <td style="width: 85px">3</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px"><span style="color: #000000">04-May</span></td> <td style="width: 84px"><span style="color: #000000">15.5</span></td> <td style="width: 87.41px"><span style="color: #000000">7.6</span></td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"><span style="color: #000000"> </span></td> <td style="width: 84px"><span style="color: #000000">8.3</span></td> <td style="width: 85px"><span style="color: #000000">4.8</span></td> <td style="width: 59px"><span style="color: #000000">24.2</span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>7-day Ave</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 84px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>12.3</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 87.41px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>4.3</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 58.58px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong> </strong></span></td> <td style="width: 61px"><span style="color: #ff0000"> </span></td> <td style="width: 84px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>15.3</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 85px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>5.1</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 59px"><strong> </strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">05-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">17.5</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">5.3</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">9</td> <td style="width: 85px">7</td> <td style="width: 59px">33.3</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">06-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">21.3</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">3.1</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">8</td> <td style="width: 85px">5</td> <td style="width: 59px">6.8</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">07-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">18.1</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">4.3</td> <td style="width: 58.58px">0.2</td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">9</td> <td style="width: 85px">1</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">08-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">17.4</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">0.4</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">9</td> <td style="width: 85px">2</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">09-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">15.9</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">0.1</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">11</td> <td style="width: 85px">5</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">10-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">12.3</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">3.6</td> <td style="width: 58.58px">0.4</td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">12</td> <td style="width: 85px">6</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">11-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">18.9</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">11.1</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">13</td> <td style="width: 85px">8</td> <td style="width: 59px">0.4</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>7-day Ave</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 84px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>17.3</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 87.41px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>4.0</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 58.58px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong> </strong></span></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px"><strong>10.1</strong></td> <td style="width: 85px"><strong>6.1</strong></td> <td style="width: 59px"><strong> </strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">12-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">21.5</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">10.2</td> <td style="width: 58.58px">8.4</td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">15</td> <td style="width: 85px">10</td> <td style="width: 59px">4.9</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">13-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">20.3</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">12.7</td> <td style="width: 58.58px">2.8</td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">14</td> <td style="width: 85px">9</td> <td style="width: 59px">16.1</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">14-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">12.9</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">4.7</td> <td style="width: 58.58px">4.8</td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">15</td> <td style="width: 85px">7</td> <td style="width: 59px">8</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">15-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">8.0</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">0.7</td> <td style="width: 58.58px">0.2</td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">14</td> <td style="width: 85px">8</td> <td style="width: 59px">1.7</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">16-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">17.8</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">0.7</td> <td style="width: 58.58px">0.2</td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">15</td> <td style="width: 85px">10</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">17-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">16.8</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">7.1</td> <td style="width: 58.58px">0.2</td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">16</td> <td style="width: 85px">11</td> <td style="width: 59px">3</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">18-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">17.3</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">1.6</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">17</td> <td style="width: 85px">13</td> <td style="width: 59px">13.3</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>7-day Ave</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 84px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>16.4</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 87.41px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>5.4</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 58.58px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong> </strong></span></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px"><strong>15.1</strong></td> <td style="width: 85px"><strong>9.7</strong></td> <td style="width: 59px"><strong> </strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">19-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">19.4</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">1.6</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">20</td> <td style="width: 85px">13</td> <td style="width: 59px">0.5</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">20-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">20.5</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">3.4</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">20</td> <td style="width: 85px">8</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">21-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">21.0</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">9.4</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">20</td> <td style="width: 85px">7</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">22-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">20.3</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">5.9</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">21</td> <td style="width: 85px">8</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">23-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">25.3</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">3.8</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">21</td> <td style="width: 85px">9</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">24-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">28.7</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">6.3</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">19</td> <td style="width: 85px">9</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px">25-May</td> <td style="width: 84px">30.2</td> <td style="width: 87.41px">13.9</td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px">19</td> <td style="width: 85px">9</td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>7-day Ave</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 84px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>23.6</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 87.41px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong>6.3</strong></span></td> <td style="width: 58.58px"><span style="color: #ff0000"><strong> </strong></span></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px"><strong>20</strong></td> <td style="width: 85px"><strong>9</strong></td> <td style="width: 59px"><strong> </strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width: 90px"></td> <td style="width: 84px"></td> <td style="width: 87.41px"></td> <td style="width: 58.58px"></td> <td style="width: 61px"></td> <td style="width: 84px"></td> <td style="width: 85px"></td> <td style="width: 59px"></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> http://fieldcropnews.com/2017/05/ridgetown-agribusiness-breakfast-meeting-may-2-2017/feed/ 0 2017-05-08 18:16 +00:00 2017-05-08 14:16 -04:00