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The soy house lands in Acton

November 18, 2009 (Acton, ON) – What do household insulation, mattress foam and kitchen cabinets all have in common?  Soybeans! Yes Soybeans. The Soy House, the feature exhibit at this year’s Royal Agricultural Winter Fair enabled visitors to experience how soy can be used as an environmentally-friendly, sustainable replacement to petroleum oil in many household products. The house demonstrates the emerging soy market in Ontario and showcases the complete soybean value chain, from agricultural roots to people’s homes. By partnering with Quality Homes and Habitat for Humanity Halton, the first-ever Soy House has landed in Acton for a Habitat partner family to call home.

The commercial uses of soy are made possible by separating soybeans into two distinct and equally useful parts.  When crushed, 80 percent of the bean becomes high protein soy meal, which is used for human and animal consumption, while the remaining 20 percent becomes soy oil, which can be used as bio-fuels and as a sustainable replacement to petroleum oil. “The use of soy as a renewable alternative to petrochemicals enables the development of a wide array of greener, eco-friendly products for consumers,” said Dale Petrie, Director of Strategic Development and Innovation, Grain Farmers of Ontario.

A deserving Habitat family will benefit from living in the Soy House, which will have lower energy costs and features soy-based structural components, thereby reducing harmful off-gases, in everything from No-VOC paints and varnishes, adhesives, household insulation, kitchen cabinets and bathroom fixtures. “The partnership with Habitat for Humanity Halton was a natural fit as we showcase the benefits of using soy. Ontario soybean farmers and our partners are committed to volunteering with Habitat to complete the house, ensuring the partner family is able to move in as early as possible” continues Petrie.

"Ontario soybean farmers’ unique partnership with Habitat for Humanity Halton and Quality Homes has helped provide another family in the Halton region with a safe, decent, affordable place to live,” says Lynn Fergusson, Interim Executive Director, Habitat for Humanity Halton. “This unique partnership is proof of what can be done when passion, dedication and resources are pooled together, to truly make a difference in the community.”

“Quality Homes is proud to have partnered with Ontario’s soybean farmers to bring The Soy House to the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair and to Habitat for Humanity Halton,” says Howard Sher, Executive Vice-President, Quality Homes. “As custom home builders, we are always looking for new and innovative products and suppliers. The project has certainly introduced us to a range of environmentally-friendly, soy-based companies.”

Over the coming weeks all partners with join the selected family in completing the remaining work in order turn over the keys to their new home.

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Weekly Commentary

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Grain Market Commentary for September 20, 2017

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Commodity Period Price Weekly Movement
Corn CBOT December 3.50  01 cents
Soybeans CBOT November 9.70  11 cents
Wheat CBOT December 4.50  07 cents
Wheat Minn. December 6.22  12 cents
Wheat Kansas December 4.48  05 cents
Chicago Oats December 2.46  08 cents
Canadian $ December 0.8115  0.75 points

Harvest 2017 prices as of the close, September 20 are as follows:
SWW @ $190.53/MT ($5.19/bu), HRW @ $199.60/MT ($5.43/bu),
HRS @ $241.11/MT ($6.56/bu), SRW @ $195.06/MT ($5.31/bu).

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Market Trends Report for September-October 2017

Monday, September 18, 2017

US and World

Across the US corn belt American farmers are starting to harvest another huge crop. The growing season was uneven with widespread drought in the Northwest plains and quite a wet start in the Eastern corn belt. This was accentuated by somewhat dry conditions in mid-summer, but it looks like good genetics and modern farming methods have won out. As we careen into October, US farmers are set to harvest their third-largest corn crop and the largest soybean crop ever.

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On September 12th the USDA released their latest estimates of US crops. USDA estimated US corn production would come in at 14.184 billion bushels, with an average yield of 169.9 bushels per acre. This was seen as a bit of a shock to the market as traders were expecting lower yield estimates. The USDA also increased 2017/18 ending stocks to 2.335 billion bushels, up 62 million from their August report. This US crop is approximately 6% less than last year with the yield 4.7 bushels per acre lower.

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