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Annual district meetings in progress

Grain Farmers of Ontario will be holding Annual District Grain Committee Meetings during the month of January. These meetings are called to receive reports, elect the District delegates, alternates, and directors, and conduct other business as may properly come before the annual meeting. All barley, corn, oat, soybean, and wheat farmers are encouraged to attend their local meeting.

The schedule of district meetings is here.

Food vs. Fuel: the debate is over

GUELPH, ON (April 26, 2011) – A new study released by the Grain Farmers of Ontario should put an end to the ongoing debate of whether the grain we grow should be used for food or fuel.  We can and should do both.

The abundance of grain grown by farmers around the world and here in Ontario can both protect the environment and feed the world.  As farm yields climb and investments are made in farm production in the developing world, feeding and fueling the world can even be done cost effectively.

“My corn yields have increased by 35 percent since I started farming in 1975,” says Don Kenny who farms just outside of Ottawa and is the chair of Grain Farmers of Ontario.  “I am confident that my land will continue to be productive and that new products and technologies will ensure my family supplies our local livestock market and the ethanol plant down the road for many years to come.”

According to the study by Dr. Terry Daynard and KD Communications, by including an average of just 5% ethanol in regular gasoline, Canadians are reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 2.3 million tonnes annually while saving money.  Five percent ethanol blending has reduced annual family gasoline expenditures by more than $100 per year.  Ethanol is also credited with replacing hazardous compounds in gasoline used for octane enhancement and increasing engine efficiency. 

There is also good news for the world’s food supply. Food demands around the world are growing by 1.1% per year according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Fortunately, the Grain Farmers of Ontario study reveals that global grain production has increased by 1.5% per year over the past 20 years. With increasing resources now being directed to agricultural development in some of the world’s hungriest countries, especially in Africa, there is optimism that we will continue to grow the crops and increase production where the need is greatest.

“Quite frankly, it is a relief for us to learn that production of biofuels, like ethanol, here in Ontario makes such a positive contribution to our environment without any notable impact on overall food prices and the world’s ability to supply food,” says Barry Senft, CEO for Grain Farmers of Ontario.  “Regardless of this discussion, our farmers are dedicated to growing a sufficient supply of food for Canadian families”.

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.

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Weekly Commentary

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Grain Market Commentary for January 17, 2018

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Commodity Period Price Weekly Movement
Corn CBOT March 3.53  04 cents
Soybeans CBOT March 9.69  15 cents
Wheat CBOT March 4.21  13 cents
Wheat Minn. March 6.12  22 cents
Wheat Kansas March 4.27  13 cents
Chicago Oats March 2.54  09 cents
Canadian $ March 0.8060  0.80 points

Cash Grain prices as of the close, January 17, are as follows: SWW @ $176.58/MT ($4.81/bu), HRW @ $181.14/MT ($4.93/bu), HRS @ $231.22/MT ($6.29/bu), SRW @ $176.58/MT ($4.81/bu).

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Market Trends Report for January-February 2018

Monday, January 15, 2018

US and World

Winter weather blows across North American farm country as another year has gone and we greet 2018. The 2017 growing season was very uneven across North America, but memories of that are fading. Grain prices have suffered under the specter of big crop numbers that have been projected by both the USDA and private analysts throughout 2017. The January USDA report is always the final report on the crop year that past. On January 12th the USDA released a plethora of crop numbers, which will define the grain marketplace for the coming year.

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On January 12th, the USDA increased 2017 US corn production to 14.6 billion bushels, on a harvested acreage of 82.7 million acres. The average yield was increased to 176.6 bushels per acre, which was 2 bushels above the 2016/17 crop. 2017/18 corn ending stocks were raised to 2.48 billion bushels. Total corn usage was actually reduced to 14.470 billion bushels, down from 14.485 last month. US exports are down and US ethanol corn usage was down from December. Corn stored on December 1 was 12.516 billion bushels, which was above trade expectations.

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