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Grain Farmers of Ontario board elects executive committee

GUELPH, ON (February 9, 2012) – The new board of directors at Grain Farmers of Ontario met for the first time this week and the 2012 Executive Committee has been chosen.

The board elected Henry Van Ankum as the new Chair of the organization to replace Don Kenny who, as the first Chair of Grain Farmers of Ontario, has completed two years of dedicated service and is congratulated by the board and staff for his many accomplishments in the position.

“I am excited about the challenge ahead to build upon the solid foundation laid in the first two years of our organization,” says Van Ankum. “Don was an effective leader, representing GFO well, and I look forward to continuing his work to provide strong representation for our members provincially and nationally.

Mark Huston was elected to the role of first Vice Chair on the Executive Committee. Huston is the director representing District 2 in Kent County.  Second Vice Chair is Mark Brock, from the Stratford area in District 9.  New to the Executive Committee is Leo Guilbeault from District 1 who will take on the role of Executive Member.

Also in 2012 there are two new directors on the Grain Farmers of Ontario Board – Kevin Armstrong representing District 7 and Colin Elliot representing District 11.  For a complete list of the directors on the Grain Farmers of Ontario board and the elected delegates from each district, please visit www.gfo.ca.

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.

Contact:

Barry Senft, CEO - 1-800-265-0550; bsenft@gfo.ca

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Grain Market Commentary for July 19, 2017

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Commodity Period Price Weekly Movement
Corn CBOT September 3.82  03 cents
Soybeans CBOT November 10.12  25 cents
Wheat CBOT September 5.03  32 cents
Wheat Minn. September 7.75  06 cents
Wheat Kansas September 5.00  44 cents
Chicago Oats September 2.93  11 cents
Canadian $ September 0.7950  1.00 points

Harvest 2017 prices as of the close, July 19 are as follows:
SWW @ $218.72/MT ($5.95/bu), HRW @ $218.72/MT ($5.95/bu),
HRS @ $289.01/MT ($7.87/bu), SRW @ $217.90/MT ($5.93/bu).

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Special Post June 30 USDA Market Trends Report

Tuesday, July 04, 2017

US and the World

It can be an explosive time in the grain markets. Across the greater US corn belt corn, soybeans and wheat are showing great variability as we head into July. Historically, the July 4th weekend has always served as a market flashpoint as crops start to develop quickly and summer weather makes its impact. The June 30th USDA planted acreage estimates and quarterly stocks report also impact the market at this critical time. In 2017, we are here again and once again the USDA did provide some surprises for market action.

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In their June 30th USDA report many market observers were musing that US soybean acres may overtake US corn acres planted. However, that was not the case as USDA predicted US corn planting at 90.89 million acres and US soybean planting coming in at 89.51 million acres. US corn acreage is down 3.11 million acres from last year. The US soybean acreage was approximately 440,000 acres below pre report estimates, but still 7% higher than last year. All wheat acreage came in at approximately 45.66 million acres, which was the lowest since the USDA began keeping records in 1919.

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