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Ontario wheat quality scoop indicates protein levels up in 2013

GUELPH, ON (October 16, 2013) – The Results of the 2013 Ontario Wheat Quality Scoop Program are now available.

A joint effort between the Canadian Grain Commission and Grain Farmers of Ontario, with the cooperation of grain companies, the Quality Scoop Program provides wheat quality information to Ontario wheat producers, marketers and processors.

“The Ontario Wheat Quality Scoop Program provides timely and accurate information to the wheat industry within the province, and also to our global buyers, “says Todd Austin, Marketing Manager at Grain Farmers. “Ontario millers, bakers and food manufacturers rely on this information as a guide to the end use performance and functionality of the year’s crop.”

Representative samples are collected across the province as soon as the first wheat deliveries arrive at elevators and terminals. The samples are sent to the Canadian Grain Commission’s Grain Research Laboratory where they are combined by region, class and grade and are analyzed for parameters that reflect end-use quality and performance.

While Fusarium challenges were seen across the province, wheat graded 2 or higher saw exceptional quality results. Average protein levels for CESRW, CESWW and CEHRW were up almost a full percentage from 2012 averaging 9.5%, 9.9% and 11.1%. Falling numbers also remained strong across each class averaging 360 for CESRW, 370 for CESWW and 330 for CEHRW.

“These results are a direct indication of the work that farmers are doing on selecting varieties and management techniques that maximize quality and functionality” says Austin “Even in a year with as much variability as we had we still produced high quality wheat.”

 For the full 2013 report please visit http://www.gfo.ca/Production/QualityScoops

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.

Contact:

Barry Senft, CEO - 1-800-265-0550; bsenft@gfo.ca

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Grain Market Commentary for August 16, 2017

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Commodity Period Price Weekly Movement
Corn CBOT September 3.52  20 cents
Soybeans CBOT November 9.25  53 cents
Wheat CBOT September 4.20  44 cents
Wheat Minn. September 6.73  60 cents
Wheat Kansas September 4.20  24 cents
Chicago Oats September 2.60  10 cents
Canadian $ September 0.7898  0.15 points

Harvest 2017 prices as of the close, August 16 are as follows:
SWW @ $182.43/MT ($4.96/bu), HRW @ $189.46/MT ($5.16/bu),
HRS @ $254.49/MT ($6.93/bu), SRW @ $187.11/MT ($5.09/bu).

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Market Trends Report for August-September 2017

Monday, August 14, 2017

US and World

It has been an uneven growing season in much of the American corn belt. The Western corn belt has been dry especially in the Dakotas, while the mid south and Eastern corn belt were inundated with heavy rains earlier in the spring. The forecast in late July turned cooler and wetter for all of the American corn belt. This new forecast essentially changed much of the outlook for the American crop, but still many analysts were expecting lower August USDA numbers reflecting some of the earlier tough conditions for US corn and soybeans. Anticipation of the August 10th USDA report was filled with expectations of lower yield projections.

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On August 10th, the USDA lowered their projected corn yield estimate to 169.5 bushels per acre down from their earlier projection of 170.7 bushels per acre and less than last year's 174.6 bushels per acre. At the same time the USDA raised soybean yield expectations to 49.4 bushels per acre up from their 48 bushels per acre earlier estimate. This pegged 2017/18-soybean production at 4.4 billion bushels. Both of these USDA estimates rocked the grain market August 10th, as it was a big surprise. With so much uneven weather affecting this crop in the field a US corn yield of 165-166 bushels per acre was a general trade estimate. Futures prices plummeted on this very bearish report.

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