News

Grain farming under attack by government

New Pesticide Regulations Impractical and Unrealistic

GUELPH, ON (November 25, 2014) – Grain Farmers of Ontario is confounded by today’s announcement by the government to reduce neonicotinoid use by 80% by 2017. The announcement flies in the face of numerous efforts and investments made by grain farmers across the province over the past two years to mitigate risks to bee health.

“This new regulation is unfounded, impractical, and unrealistic and the government does not know how to implement it,” says Henry Van Ankum, Chair of Grain Farmers of Ontario. “With this announcement, agriculture and rural Ontario has been put on notice – the popular vote trumps science and practicality.”

Grain Farmers of Ontario has invested in ongoing multi-year research projects to mitigate risks to bee health associated with neonicotinoids. In 2014, all 28,000 grain farmers across the province followed new best management practices and utilized a new fluency agent to minimize possible seed treatment exposure to bees. This year, 70% less bee deaths were reported.  

“A reduction at this level puts our farmers at a competitive disadvantage with the rest of the country and the rest of the North America,” says Barry Senft, CEO of Grain Farmers of Ontario. “It will mean smaller margins for grain farmers and could signal the transition away from family farms to large multinational farming operations that can sustain lower margins.”

Grain Farmers of Ontario has expressed its concerns over these regulations at all levels of government in recent meetings. A restriction at the 80% level is comparable to a total ban on the product, which the Conference Board of Canada estimates will cost Ontario farmers more than $630 million annually in lost revenue.

“At a time when the government is calling for more jobs, this is a step in the wrong direction,” says Van Ankum. “Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency continues to license this product for the country and Ontario is now being forced to operate in isolation at an enormous competitive disadvantage – the livelihoods of countless farmers are in jeopardy.” 

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.

Contact:

Barry Senft, CEO - 1-800-265-0550; bsenft@gfo.ca

Henry Van Ankum, Chair - 519-835-4200; henryvanankum@sympatico.ca

Meghan Burke, Communications – 519 767-2773; mburke@gfo.ca

Stay in touch

Annual Report

The 2017 Grain Farmers of Ontario Annual Report is now available.

Read it now or download a .pdf.


Subscribe to the Bottom Line

Subscribe to The Bottom Line, the weekly newsletter that helps our members stay on top of all the news that affects their bottom line.

Read the latest issue (September 22, 2017)

Subscribe


Inside Grain Farmers of Ontario

New episodes every week.

Episode 57: Communications: The CNE


Follow us

twitter   linkedin   youtube

Weekly Commentary

Get Aggregated RSS

Grain Market Commentary for September 20, 2017

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Commodity Period Price Weekly Movement
Corn CBOT December 3.50  01 cents
Soybeans CBOT November 9.70  11 cents
Wheat CBOT December 4.50  07 cents
Wheat Minn. December 6.22  12 cents
Wheat Kansas December 4.48  05 cents
Chicago Oats December 2.46  08 cents
Canadian $ December 0.8115  0.75 points

Harvest 2017 prices as of the close, September 20 are as follows:
SWW @ $190.53/MT ($5.19/bu), HRW @ $199.60/MT ($5.43/bu),
HRS @ $241.11/MT ($6.56/bu), SRW @ $195.06/MT ($5.31/bu).

Read more

Market Trends

Get Aggregated RSS

Market Trends Report for September-October 2017

Monday, September 18, 2017

US and World

Across the US corn belt American farmers are starting to harvest another huge crop. The growing season was uneven with widespread drought in the Northwest plains and quite a wet start in the Eastern corn belt. This was accentuated by somewhat dry conditions in mid-summer, but it looks like good genetics and modern farming methods have won out. As we careen into October, US farmers are set to harvest their third-largest corn crop and the largest soybean crop ever.

Listen to the podcast

On September 12th the USDA released their latest estimates of US crops. USDA estimated US corn production would come in at 14.184 billion bushels, with an average yield of 169.9 bushels per acre. This was seen as a bit of a shock to the market as traders were expecting lower yield estimates. The USDA also increased 2017/18 ending stocks to 2.335 billion bushels, up 62 million from their August report. This US crop is approximately 6% less than last year with the yield 4.7 bushels per acre lower.

Read more

sustainability
mobile apps