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Federal pest management regulatory agency reports 80% drop in in-season bee mortality over two-year period

GUELPH, ON (June 18, 2015) – New data from the Government of Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency shows an 80% in-season bee mortality decrease for the 2015 corn and soybean planting season, compared to 2013. The 2014 season saw a 70% decline in bee mortality, suggesting the federal government’s leadership on neonicotinoids through improved best practices has been successful.

The Government of Ontario’s Provincial Apiarist, in their 2014 report, suggested measures taken by grain farmers contributed to the reduction in bee mortality. Despite this, farmers remain in the province’s crosshairs while they ignore the self-reported poor hive management practices of beekeepers, which beekeepers believe contributed to higher than normal mortalities in years prior.

“Ontario’s rush to be the first in North America to restrict neonicotinoids is on track to cost rural Ontario’s economy more than $600 million dollars a year, to solve a problem that it appears the Federal government has already addressed,” says Mark Brock, Chair of Grain Farmers of Ontario.

The Government of Ontario’s rush to regulate treated seeds, without scientific basis, is dividing rural Ontario and further exacerbating the urban-rural divide. At the same time, agenda-driven, political appointees are fracturing rural relationships.

Tibor Szabo, a provincial government appointed advisor on pesticides and President of the Ontario Beekeepers Association, has stated that “bees continue to die from the overuse of neonicotinoids,” despite the fact that his members are reporting dramatically reduced in-season mortality rates to the government.

In a recent interview, Szabo also issued a veiled threat to Ontario grain farmers, saying “when you apply chemicals to the environment, the Canadian Law is whoever released the chemical is legally responsible for whatever effects there are,” while suggesting farmers are legally liable for the health of pollinators within a five kilometre radius of their farmland.

“Ontario beekeepers readily admit to the province that poor hive management by beekeepers in four areas (starvation, weak colonies, fungal infections, and mite infestation), and acts of God (weather) are also likely to blame for bee moralities,” says Brock. “Farmers have done their part on the pesticide management front – when will beekeepers be expected to do theirs?”

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.

Contact:

Mark Brock, Chair - 519-274-3297; cropper01@hotmail.com

Meghan Burke, Communications – 519 767-2773; mburke@gfo.ca

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Grain Market Commentary for July 19, 2017

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Commodity Period Price Weekly Movement
Corn CBOT September 3.82  03 cents
Soybeans CBOT November 10.12  25 cents
Wheat CBOT September 5.03  32 cents
Wheat Minn. September 7.75  06 cents
Wheat Kansas September 5.00  44 cents
Chicago Oats September 2.93  11 cents
Canadian $ September 0.7950  1.00 points

Harvest 2017 prices as of the close, July 19 are as follows:
SWW @ $218.72/MT ($5.95/bu), HRW @ $218.72/MT ($5.95/bu),
HRS @ $289.01/MT ($7.87/bu), SRW @ $217.90/MT ($5.93/bu).

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Special Post June 30 USDA Market Trends Report

Tuesday, July 04, 2017

US and the World

It can be an explosive time in the grain markets. Across the greater US corn belt corn, soybeans and wheat are showing great variability as we head into July. Historically, the July 4th weekend has always served as a market flashpoint as crops start to develop quickly and summer weather makes its impact. The June 30th USDA planted acreage estimates and quarterly stocks report also impact the market at this critical time. In 2017, we are here again and once again the USDA did provide some surprises for market action.

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In their June 30th USDA report many market observers were musing that US soybean acres may overtake US corn acres planted. However, that was not the case as USDA predicted US corn planting at 90.89 million acres and US soybean planting coming in at 89.51 million acres. US corn acreage is down 3.11 million acres from last year. The US soybean acreage was approximately 440,000 acres below pre report estimates, but still 7% higher than last year. All wheat acreage came in at approximately 45.66 million acres, which was the lowest since the USDA began keeping records in 1919.

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