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Letter to the Environmental Commissioner of Ontario

January 15, 2016

Dear Dr. Dianne Saxe, Environmental Commissioner,

I am writing you on behalf of the 28,000 grain and oilseed farmers that Grain Farmers of Ontario represents. We would like to request a meeting in the next couple of weeks to provide you with an overview of our industry and information about the commitment to the environment and stewardship practiced by our farmer-members.

We would also like to specifically address the comments we have seen in the media this week from your office. We firmly believe in education and collaboration. It is easy to have misconceptions – the best way to ensure that we understand your priorities for the environment and our business, as well as for you to understand our sector, is to sit down and share ideas and information.

Ontario grain and oilseed farmers grow barley, corn, oats, soybeans, and wheat and the end products made from our crops are used to feed people, provide environmentally sustainable alternatives to products traditionally produced from fossil fuels, and feed animals. The grain farming sector is a major contributor to the Ontario economy and the environment in many very positive ways. Grain farmers are stewards of both their productive and non-productive farmland. There are many wetlands and other environmentally beneficial spaces created by farmers and there are a number of ways that both farmland and farmers contribute to a sustainable Ontario environment.

I have been travelling across the province over the past week and farmers from all regions are alarmed by comments they have read in the media about coloured diesel, coming from your office. Agriculture consumes only three percent of all diesel used in Ontario. The amount of diesel used by grain farmers has steadily declined over the years as the result of improved efficiencies in farming practices (reducing machinery passes on fields) and improved fuel efficiencies in farm vehicles and machinery. The road tax exemption for coloured diesel has been in place for farmers across North America for many years, because farm machinery is not intended for use on roads. It is also important to note that Ontario grain farmers are price takers, as grain is traded on a global market – we compete directly with US farmers in the Great Lakes Basin who have significantly lower production costs.

The road tax exemption is important for Ontario grain farmers, as well as many other sectors of agriculture across the province. I look forward to discussing this, and more, with you in the near future.

Debra Conlon from our office will be in touch to schedule a meeting.

Sincerely,

Mark Brock
Chair, Grain Farmers of Ontario

Also available in .pdf format.

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Grain Market Commentary for July 19, 2017

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Commodity Period Price Weekly Movement
Corn CBOT September 3.82  03 cents
Soybeans CBOT November 10.12  25 cents
Wheat CBOT September 5.03  32 cents
Wheat Minn. September 7.75  06 cents
Wheat Kansas September 5.00  44 cents
Chicago Oats September 2.93  11 cents
Canadian $ September 0.7950  1.00 points

Harvest 2017 prices as of the close, July 19 are as follows:
SWW @ $218.72/MT ($5.95/bu), HRW @ $218.72/MT ($5.95/bu),
HRS @ $289.01/MT ($7.87/bu), SRW @ $217.90/MT ($5.93/bu).

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Special Post June 30 USDA Market Trends Report

Tuesday, July 04, 2017

US and the World

It can be an explosive time in the grain markets. Across the greater US corn belt corn, soybeans and wheat are showing great variability as we head into July. Historically, the July 4th weekend has always served as a market flashpoint as crops start to develop quickly and summer weather makes its impact. The June 30th USDA planted acreage estimates and quarterly stocks report also impact the market at this critical time. In 2017, we are here again and once again the USDA did provide some surprises for market action.

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In their June 30th USDA report many market observers were musing that US soybean acres may overtake US corn acres planted. However, that was not the case as USDA predicted US corn planting at 90.89 million acres and US soybean planting coming in at 89.51 million acres. US corn acreage is down 3.11 million acres from last year. The US soybean acreage was approximately 440,000 acres below pre report estimates, but still 7% higher than last year. All wheat acreage came in at approximately 45.66 million acres, which was the lowest since the USDA began keeping records in 1919.

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