Grain Farmers of Ontario annual harvest survey begins

GUELPH, ON (August 5, 2011) – Grain Farmers of Ontario is once again conducting the annual wheat harvest survey that will provide our buyers with qualitative data from the 2011 wheat harvest.  Results to date show good test weights and solid grade #2 wheat and milling and baking tests have begun on the first half of the crop.

For the Grain Farmers of Ontario, having the quality of wheat that buyers are looking for is essential to maintaining the domestic and international reputation of our wheat and the profitable success of our farmer members.  An annual survey allows for our customers to compare this year’s wheat quality to years past and adjust their grist to ensure a seamless transition between crop years.

“The result of the quality inspection is a snapshot of the quality of Ontario’s wheat that we make available to everyone in the industry,” says Mike Reimer Ontario Wheat Technologist with the Canadian International Grains Institute (CIGI).

The Harvest Survey is conducted each year at this time right across the province in order to understand the overall quality of the year’s Ontario wheat crop and identify points of regional differentiation. Harvest samples are collected from participating grain elevators and terminals throughout the harvest season. As grains are delivered, 1kg sample bags are taken and labeled with the variety of wheat and where it is grown then graded by the Canadian Grain Commission. The grain is then sent for milling followed by a flour quality inspection by the Canadian International Grains Institute in Winnipeg, MB.

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.

Grain Farmers of Ontario update wheat moisture requirements

GUELPH, ON (July 07, 2011) – Grain Farmers of Ontario is moving from a standard of 14.5% moisture to 14% in keeping with the industry standards set last year.

While 14.5% is an adequate moisture level for wheat storage in Canada; 14.0% was chosen in response to our customers requests and it is also more in-line with international standards. It’s important to note that all wheat deliveries to GFO this year must be at least 14.0% moisture to avoid incurring any drying costs.

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.

Grain Farmers of Ontario landed basis (initial payment) price chart 2011 crop year

GUELPH, ON (July 07, 2011) – Grain Farmers of Ontario announces the initial payments for the 2011 pool program. These prices are based on current market conditions and represent an estimated 65% of the final price. “GFO’s pool program allows farmer members an opportunity to diversify their marketing risk during these volatile times.” Barry Senft C.E.O Grain Farmers of Ontario. In the past 7 years, five of those have paid more to pool participants than the cash price market available at harvest.

SWW (Pool A)
Gross landed basis price
Less license fee*
Net landed basis price
$152.00
$0.97
$151.03
HRW (Pool B) Grown from certified seed (proof required)
Gross landed basis price
Less license fee*
Net landed basis price
$157.00
$0.97
$156.03
HRS (Pool C) Grown from certified seed (proof required)
Gross landed basis price

Less license fee*
Net landed basis price
$172.00
$0.97
$171.03
SRW (Pool E)
Gross landed basis price
Less license fee*
Net landed basis price
$142.00
$0.97
$141.03
Hard Red (Pool F)
Gross landed basis price
Less license fee*
Net landed basis price
$142.00
$0.97
$141.03
Feed (Pool G)
Gross landed basis price
Less license fee*
Net landed basis price
$122.00
$0.97
$121.03

Notes: 

  • Landed Basis Levels are subject to change 
  • Classes HRW & HRS (Pools B & C) – plus protein payment 
  • Discounts will apply for lower grades 
  • Prices in metric tonne 

Please refer to the variety list on our website (http://www.gfo.ca/Marketing/WheatMarketing/InitialPayments) for the varieties accepted for Pool C (HRS). All varieties not accepted in Pool C (HRS) will be considered Pool F (HR). Please remember that Grain Farmers of Ontario requires a Form 7 producer declaration for all Pool B (HRW) and Pool C (HRS) wheat.

* Effective July 1 2011 every producer of wheat shall pay to the local board licence fees at the rate of $0.87 per metric tonne plus the Grain Financial Protection Plan fee of $0.10 per metric tonne, for a total of $0.97 (includes 10 cents for Grain Financial Protection Fund) per metric tonne, in respect of all wheat marketed by the producer.

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.

OMAFRA Extension Support

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

Horst Bohner

RESEARCH INSTITUTION

Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA)

PROJECT START

July 2011

PROJECT END

September 2018

OBJECTIVES

  • Enhance soybean extension efforts in Ontario to ensure growers have access to the most up to date information. This project focuses on three main areas: Improved Information Gathering, Enhanced Extension Efforts, and Breaking Issue Support.

IMPACT

  • The development and display of demonstration and research trials provides farmers and agronomists information on production strategies that was gathered and assessed to update best management strategies in soybean production.
  • The accessibility of timely, high quality information enables producers to make informed in-season management decisions.
  • The development and printing of the Ontario Soybean Field Guide and in the development of the soybean chapter in the new Agronomy Guide is an example of how the project supported extension efforts.

SCIENTIFIC SUMMARY

Agricultural extension (technology transfer) is a key component to ensure the ongoing competitiveness and sustainability of the Ontario grain sector. Agricultural Extension has a strong history in Ontario dating back to the establishment of the Ontario School of Agriculture at Guelph in 1874. Agricultural Extension is a general term referring to the education of farmers and agronomists with respect to the application of scientific research and new knowledge to agricultural practices. The first Agricultural Representatives were hired by the Department of Agriculture in 1906. Since then there has been a strong collaborative extension effort in Ontario. Today, the rapid development of new technologies drives the need for continued extension in the province. Extension is an area which is often difficult to support financially from either direct OMAFRA or external funding sources.

This project is dedicated to improvements in Agricultural Extension and is focussed on three main areas: Improved Information Gathering, Enhanced Extension Efforts, and Breaking Issue Support. Initiatives supported with the Enhanced Extension Efforts include: Phosphorus and potassium management, double cropping soybeans, foliar fungicide timing, soybean row width strategies, etc.

Information was disseminated through the following:

  • Grower meeting presentations
  • Delivery of findings via the “Crop” suite of extension vehicles (CropLine, CropAdvances, CropReport, CropPest)
  • Web reports available at www.fieldcropnews.com
  • Video delivery of findings through www.realagriculture.com
  • Presentations available through sliderocket
  • Media interviews and articles via many print media sources (Ontario Farmer, Top Crop Manager, etc.)
  • Radio delivery through regular farm broadcasts (CFCO, CKNX)

Grain Farmers of Ontario pleased with permanent risk management program

GUELPH, ON (June 29, 2011) – Grain Farmers of Ontario is pleased with the details that were finalized earlier this month regarding the permanent Risk Management Program and announced for Ontario’s 28,000 grain farmers by Minister Carol Mitchell today. 

The program was designed by farmers for farmers to insure their businesses against risk factors out of their control like commodity price volatility, currency fluctuations and unexpected input cost increases.

“We have been looking forward to the day our program was made permanent since our pilot Risk Management Program began in 2007,” says Don Kenny, Chair of Grain Farmers of Ontario.  “We are thankful to our Minister of Agriculture, Carol Mitchell for her hard work and dedication to Ontario’s farmers.”

Program applications for grain farmers will be available in August and the program will continue to be delivered through Agricorp.  All grain farmers are eligible for the Risk Management Program and premiums have been waived for the 2011 crop year.

Grain Farmers of Ontario would like to thank Premier McGuinty and our Ontario MPPs who recognize the value of a strong agricultural sector in this province.  

“We appreciate and look forward to having this permanent Risk Management Program for Ontario’s farmers,” says Kenny.

Details about the program are available at www.ontario.ca/rmp, by calling 1-877-424-1300, or by sending an email to rmpinfo@ontario.ca.

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.

Grain Farmers of Ontario new community page and blog are live!

GUELPH, ON (June 22, 2011) – Grain Farmers of Ontario’s website has become an industry leader in providing up to the minute news, crop updates, market information, the latest agricultural research and more.

Now, the Grain Farmers of Ontario website has launched a community page at www.gfo.ca/community to create an area of interest to the general public looking for general farm news, and links to products made from corn, soy and wheat. Visitors will also find fun trivia and general grain information, book reviews and recipe sharing.

The new community page will also feature a new blog titled “Growing Grain”.  The focus of the blog will be something a little different on the Grain Farmers of Ontario website, as it documents the adventures of a city girl discovering the country and covering such topics as farm life, food, recipes and agriculture in general.

Grain Farmers of Ontario is encouraging our urban neighbours to learn more about grain farming using the community page as a starting point.  Other features of the website such as the Twitter feed and comment areas encourage those interested to engage in conversation and provide feedback on the new content.  

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.

Ontario Grain Farmer magazine makes an online splash!

GUELPH, ON (June 15, 2011) – Ontario Grain Farmer Magazine website has been revamped and is chalk-full of new features. Each week you can expect to see new content on the site including articles from the magazine with additional online information on published articles. In addition, look for online exclusive articles and more!

Take a tour around the homepage and see which stories are generating the most buzz, peek in on what we’re saying on Twitter and engage in conversation with us and other farmers. We want to get your comments on our articles, hear your thoughts on what subjects interest you the most and what else you would like to see on our website.

Come on by and see what’s new at www.ontariograinfarmer.ca.We look forward to your visit.

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.

What goes up, has historically come down

GUELPH, ON (May 17, 2011) – When food prices go up, many are quick to point the finger at our food growers and their sale of grain crops for bio-fuels like ethanol. But grain prices have spiked in the past for many reasons, and always come back down, while the cost of food doesn’t always reflect the decline in grain price.  A new study released by the Grain Farmers of Ontario explores this issue.

“The truth is that farmers receive only about 19% of the retail price of food. Average Canadians earn enough to pay the farmers’ share of annual food purchases by about noon on January 9 of each year,” says Barry Senft, CEO of Grain Farmers of Ontario.

So if it isn’t bio-fuel, what is causing food prices to rise and will they remain high?  A comparison of the commodity/ food price spikes of the 1970s and 1980 provides insight. During this earlier period, many public statements were made that commodity and food prices had climbed permanently to a new plateau. But in inflation-adjusted dollars, crop and food prices moved to new lows after 1980 as the world food supply grew at a rate that exceeded population growth.

A grain price peak was reached in 2008 and a second price peak occurring in 2011 and both are being blamed partially on grain being used for ethanol. However, price patterns are very similar to the double price peak experienced in 1974 and 1980, well before the ethanol industry was established in Ontario, which was followed by several decades of declining real grain and food prices.

In both cases, a number of factors contributed to the price spikes and not just a specific individual cause.  The common factors include crop failure in key production regions caused by extreme weather, high oil prices, civil unrest in major grain buying countries and price increases for agricultural inputs like fertilizer.  The impact of bio-fuels on world food prices in 2007, according to the US Secretary of Agriculture, was no more than 3%.

Some forecasters suggest that current high farm crop and food prices are the new norm and that prices will be both higher and more volatile for years to come. These forecasted higher prices result from a common projection that the world’s food supplying capacity will have to increase by 70% between 2000 and 2050, or about 1.1% per year. The Grain Farmers of Ontario study concludes that this growth is achievable with modern agriculture. In fact, average world grain yield increased by 1.5% per year from 1987 to 2007. 

“I have learned in over 30 years of farming that prices are cyclical – what goes up, comes down and then hopefully goes back up again,” says Grain Farmers of Ontario chair Don Kenny.  “I can’t predict what the future holds, and I expect much will depend on petroleum and input prices. But one thing is certain, Ontario’s farmers are committed to supplying adequate and safe food, first and above all else.”  

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.

Food vs. Fuel: the debate is over

GUELPH, ON (April 26, 2011) – A new study released by the Grain Farmers of Ontario should put an end to the ongoing debate of whether the grain we grow should be used for food or fuel.  We can and should do both.

The abundance of grain grown by farmers around the world and here in Ontario can both protect the environment and feed the world.  As farm yields climb and investments are made in farm production in the developing world, feeding and fueling the world can even be done cost effectively.

“My corn yields have increased by 35 percent since I started farming in 1975,” says Don Kenny who farms just outside of Ottawa and is the chair of Grain Farmers of Ontario.  “I am confident that my land will continue to be productive and that new products and technologies will ensure my family supplies our local livestock market and the ethanol plant down the road for many years to come.”

According to the study by Dr. Terry Daynard and KD Communications, by including an average of just 5% ethanol in regular gasoline, Canadians are reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 2.3 million tonnes annually while saving money.  Five percent ethanol blending has reduced annual family gasoline expenditures by more than $100 per year.  Ethanol is also credited with replacing hazardous compounds in gasoline used for octane enhancement and increasing engine efficiency. 

There is also good news for the world’s food supply. Food demands around the world are growing by 1.1% per year according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Fortunately, the Grain Farmers of Ontario study reveals that global grain production has increased by 1.5% per year over the past 20 years. With increasing resources now being directed to agricultural development in some of the world’s hungriest countries, especially in Africa, there is optimism that we will continue to grow the crops and increase production where the need is greatest.

“Quite frankly, it is a relief for us to learn that production of biofuels, like ethanol, here in Ontario makes such a positive contribution to our environment without any notable impact on overall food prices and the world’s ability to supply food,” says Barry Senft, CEO for Grain Farmers of Ontario.  “Regardless of this discussion, our farmers are dedicated to growing a sufficient supply of food for Canadian families”.

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.

One week left to sign up for the winter wheat challenge

GUELPH, ON (April 20, 2011) – There is one week left to prove that your field is up to the challenge. The deadline to register for Grain Farmers of Ontario’s first ever Winter Wheat Challenge is Monday, May 2, 2011. Sign up today and enter for your chance to win a grand prize of $1,500 and bragging rights in the countryside. Second place will take home $750 and third place rakes in $500.

The challenge is open to all Ontario farmers and all legal production practices are permitted. The field must be at least 10 acres and within that, a 1.5 acre plot must be weighed and graded for the challenge. Any certified milling quality winter wheat may be used.

For the full rules and a downloadable registration card, visit www.gfo.ca/winterwheatchallenge or, talk with representatives from our sponsoring companies Bayer CropScience, C&M Seeds and Hyland Seeds to get your registration card.

All registration cards postmarked by May 2, 2010 will be eligible for the competition.

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.