Canadian Field Crop Genetics Improvement Cluster, Activity 7: Breeding soybeans for adaptation to environment and emerging pests and concurrent development of molecular marker selection tools: Development of soybean cyst nematode (SCN) resistant early matu

Principal Investigator

Louise O’Donoughue

Research Institution

Centre de recherche sur les grains (CÉROM)

External Funding Partners

This project is part of the $10.3 million Canadian Field Crop Genetics Improvement Cluster funded by the Canadian Field Crop Research Alliance (CFCRA) and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) through the Industry-Led Research and Development Stream of the Growing Forward 2 AgriInnovation Program. Grain Farmers of Ontario is a founding member of the CFCRA.

Project Start

April 2013

Project End

March 2018

Objectives

  • Identify and validate new sources of resistances that will be resistant to the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) populations representative of the major races found in Ontario.
  • Develop breeding populations and advanced lines by performing crosses between agronomically superior early maturity lines and the best sources of SCN resistance.

Impact

  • The identification of new sources of resistance that will be effective against the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) populations which are present in Ontario.
  • The development of SCN resistant feed type soybean cultivars adapted to Canadian environments of maturity 000 to I.
  • The continued competitiveness of soybean production in Canada despite the presence of this very serious pest.

Scientific Summary

Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is the most devastating pathogen of soybean worldwide. SCN is present in most soybean growing areas of Southern Ontario and has also recently been identified in Québec. The only effective method of control for SCN is the use of resistant cultivars combined with non-host crop rotations. Some resistant cultivars have been bred for southern regions of Ontario but very few such cultivars are available for earlier maturity regions. The same resistance source (PI 88788) has been used for over 90% of the resistant cultivars in North America and there has been a breakdown of resistance in several U.S. states and Ontario. There is an urgent need to identify new sources of resistance that will be effective against the SCN populations that are present in Ontario and Québec.

The project brings together expertise in nematology and plant breeding The project will ensure that soybean SCN research targets the development of resistant varieties adapted to Canada and that soybean production in Canada remains competitive despite the presence of this very serious pest.

National Wheat Improvement Program Cluster, Activity 51: Breeding Eastern Canadian winter wheat for resistance to biotic and tolerance to abiotic stresses

Principal Investigator

Lily Tamburic-Ilincic

Research Institution

University of Guelph

External Funding Partners

This project is part of the $25.2 million National Wheat Improvement Program funded by the Western Grains Research Foundation (WGRF), the Canadian Field Crop Research Alliance (CFCRA), the Alberta Wheat Commission (AWC), and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) through the Industry-Led Research and Development Stream of the Growing Forward 2 AgriInnovation Program. Grain Farmers of Ontario is a founding member of the CFCRA.

Project Start

April 2013

Project End

March 2018

Objectives

  • Development of winter wheat germplasm with increased resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) and other diseases and stress tolerance for Eastern Canada.
  • Development of high yielding hard red winter wheat varieties with grain concentrations low in deoxynivalenol (DON) and high in protein.
  • Development of high yielding soft winter wheat varieties with increased resistance to diseases and pre-harvest sprouting (PHS).
  • Monitoring of Fusarium graminearum populations (15-ADON and 3-ADON chemotypes) across different wheat growing areas in Ontario and investigate their ability to produce mycotoxins.

Impact

  • The development of winter wheat with higher yield potential, good quality and Fusarium resistance will provide growers with a higher financial return and industry and consumers will benefit from wheat with lower DON level.
  • The improved understanding of the role of plant height, nitrogen requirements, and lodging resistance in breeding hard winter wheat with high protein and increased yield will lead to more quality hard red winter wheat produced in Ontario will lower transportation cost of bringing wheat to millers and bakers from other regions of Canada.
  • The development of new QTLs for FHB resistance, FDK level, DON accumulation and agronomic characteristics in winter wheat populations will lead to the breeding of winter wheat lines with good diseases resistance and yield for Eastern Canada.

Scientific Summary

Winter wheat is an important crop in Eastern Canada. Increased yield and better quality of wheat can be achieved by the improvement of resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. The most important winter wheat disease in Ontario is Fusarium head blight (FHB) caused by a fungus Fusarium graminearum. Good correlation between FHB visual symptoms and deoxynivalenol (DON) is reported in some studies but poor correlation in other studies. Higher correlation is reported between Fusarium damaged kernels (FDK) and DON level.

In this project, mapping populations from two crosses between a FHB resistant parent and a FHB susceptible parent were used and they were phenotyped for FHB severity and FGB incidence across different environments. In addition, these mapping populations will be used to identify QTLs for FHB index, FDK level and DON accumulation using high-density SNP arrays. A shift in the presence of two Fusarium graminearum(FG) chemotypes, 15-ADON and 3-ADON, have been reported in North America. We have been monitoring FG populations across Ontario, because the shift may influence current FHB management strategies. Combining resistance to multiple diseases and tolerance to abiotic stresses such as winter hardiness, lodging resistance, the length of the grain-fill period and resistance to pre-harvest sprouting in a single cultivar is difficult. In this project, we evaluated green leaf duration across four environments in a double haploid (DH) soft red winter wheat population using green seeker. In addition to resistance to different stresses, agronomic and quality characteristics need to be incorporated into registered winter wheat in Canada.

Grain Farmers of Ontario is excited to announce the 2012 call for corn, soybean, and wheat research proposals

GUELPH, ON (November 16, 2011) – The Grain Farmers of Ontario is welcoming the submission of proposals for research conducted in corn, soybean or wheat for funding in 2012.

Grain Farmers of Ontario targets research and innovation opportunities that will enhance our farmer members’ returns. The four main Research Priority areas are Market Development and Quality; Breeding and Genetics; Agronomy and Production; and Diseases and Insects.  There is a special emphasis this year on projects with a focus on agronomy and production and the insect and disease priority areas. Exceptional proposals in other areas will also be considered.

“Investment in research is a long-term strategic initiative of the Grain Farmers of Ontario for the benefit of all grain farmers. Our farmers have sponsored and participated in decades of practical research that has resulted in economic gains for both farmers and the province of Ontario,” says Don Kenny Chair of Grain Farmers of Ontario.

Proposals submitted must meet the Research Priorities of Grain Farmers of Ontario. Please follow the 2012 Guideline for Research Proposals and the Grain Farmers of Ontario 2012 Research Priorities documents to ensure that your proposal is aligned with the organization’s priority areas of research. Both documents can be found online at http://gfo.ca/Research.

All proposals will be reviewed by the Grain Farmers of Ontario Research Committee and the Board of Directors. It is expected that researchers will be notified of the Grain Farmers of Ontario’s funding decisions in mid-February, 2012.

The deadline for proposal submission is January 10, 2012 at 5:00pm. Researchers should submit research proposals by email to awcoleman@gfo.ca.

Proposals that best meet the Grain Farmers of Ontario Research Priorities as well as provide the most benefit to Ontario farmers will be approved for funding. Grain Farmers of Ontario strongly encourages partnerships amongst research institutions and with other funding agencies.

For more information on current research projects receiving Grain Farmers of Ontario funding support please visit http://gfo.ca/Research.

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.